Update from Washington, DC

The House and Senate are in recess this week for the Republican National Convention being held in Milwaukee, WI. Former President Trump may announce his Vice President selection tonight. The Vice Presidential pick is scheduled to speak Wednesday evening. One contender, Senator J.D. Vance (R-OH), was spotted leaving his home today with a motorcade. Former President Trump is slated to speak on Thursday, the final night of the convention. The convention will be streamed on YouTube, X, Facebook Live, Rumble, Amazon Prime, Twitch, and Direct TV.

 

https://gopconvention2024.com/master-calendar/

 

The Democratic National Convention will be held in Chicago, IL the week of August 19-22.

 

https://demconvention.com

 

Both the House and Senate will be in session the weeks of July 22 and July 29. The House will focus on finishing their fiscal year 2025 (FY25) appropriations bills during those two weeks, while the Senate may take up their FY25 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) as well as continue confirming Executive Brand and judicial nominations.

 

Fiscal Year 2025 Appropriations

House

Last week, the House Appropriations Committee completed work on all 12 of their annual spending bills. Four of these bills have narrowly passed on the House floor, however, the Legislative Branch bill was defeated last week by a vote of 205-213. This is typically one of the easier bills to pass, but some Republican members joined all Democrats who voted against the bill because it included a provision providing a pay raise for members of Congress. This could prevent the House from passing all 12 of its bills before the August recess.

 

The House plans on taking up the Agriculture, Energy & Water, Financial Services, and Interior Environment appropriations bills on the House floor when they return next week. If they manage to pass all four, they would have the four most contentious bills remaining for the final week of July.

 

Senate

Senate Appropriators started the FY25 appropriations process last week when they approved their subcommittee allocations and reported out three spending bills (Agriculture, Legislative Branch, and Military Construction-Veterans Affairs). The Senate subcommittee allocations do not include $34.5B in emergency spending ($21B for defense programs and $13.5B for nondefense programs) or other upward “adjustments” for nondefense spending that were negotiated as part of the Fiscal Responsibility Act of 2023.

 

Appropriations Subcommittee

House

Senate

Agriculture

Subcommittee: June 11

Full Committee: July 10

Floor: Week of July 22

Full Committee: July 11

Commerce Justice Science

Subcommittee: June 26

Full Committee: July 9

Floor: Week of July 29

 

Defense

Subcommittee: June 5

Full Committee: June 13

Floor: June 28 (217-198)

 

Energy & Water

Subcommittee: June 28

Full Committee: July 9

Floor: Week of July 22

 

Financial Services

Subcommittee: June 5

Full Committee: June 13

Floor: Week of July 22

 

Homeland Security

Subcommittee: June 4

Full Committee: June 12

Floor: June 28 (212-203)

 

Interior Environment

Subcommittee: June 28

Full Committee: July 9

Floor: Week of July 22

 

Labor HHS Education

Subcommittee: June 27

Full Committee: July 10

Floor: Week of July 29

 

Legislative Branch

Subcommittee: May 23

Full Committee: June 13

Floor: July 11 (Failed)

Full Committee: July 11

Military Construction VA

Subcommittee: May 21

Full Committee: May 23 Floor: June 5 (209-197)

Full Committee: July 11

State Foreign Operations

Subcommittee: June 4

Full Committee: June 12

Floor: June 28 (212-200)

 

Transportation HUD

Subcommittee: June 27

Full Committee: July 10

Floor: Week of July 29

 

 

Topline Funding Levels by Appropriations Subcommittee

 

Appropriations Subcommittee

FY2023 Enacted

FY24 Enacted

FY25 House

FY25 Senate*

Agriculture

$25.500B

$26.228B

$25.873B

$27.049B

Commerce Justice Science

$82.400B

$66.500B

$78.288B

$69.235B

Defense

$797.700B

$824.500B

$833.053B

$830.865B

Energy & Water

$54.650B

$58.191B

$59.190B

$61.467B

Financial Services

$27.600B

$13.700B

$23.608B

$21.175B

Homeland Security

$60.700B

$61.800B

$64.805B

$60.516B

Interior Environment

$38.900B

$38.600B

$38.478B

$37.650B

Labor HHS Education

$207.400B

$194.400B

$185.797B

$198.655B

Legislative Branch

$6.900B

$6.800B

$7.125B

$7.000B

Military Construction VA

$154.200B

$153.950B

$147.570B

$148.876B

State Foreign Operations

$59.700B

$55.800B

$51.713B

$55.705B

Transportation HUD

$87.300B

$89.500B

$90.400B

$87.707B

*Note that the Senate allocations do not include any of the adjustments and emergency funding agreed to as part of the Fiscal Responsibility Act agreement, or the additional emergency funding that Chair Murray and Vice Chair Collins have agreed to for fiscal year 2025. These resources will instead be reflected as  each subcommittees reports its bill.

Washington, D.C. Update

Senate Passes Emergency Supplemental for Ukraine, Israel, and Taiwan

The Senate passed a $95.3B Israel-Ukraine-Taiwan foreign aid bill earlier this week by a vote of 70-29. After being received in the House, House Speaker Mike Johnson (R-LA) first said the House needed time to “process” the bill before considering it on the floor, but then declared it dead on arrival as it didn’t include border security provisions.

 

House Republicans who want to see an emergency supplemental passed into law negotiated an alternative package that was released this morning. H.R. 7372 provides $47.7B in emergency aid to Ukraine, $10.4B for Israel, $5.4B for the Indo-Pacific including Taiwan, and $2.4B to support U.S. operations in the Middle East. The bill also includes language for the Secretary of Homeland Security to “suspend the entry of inadmissible aliens” in order to help achieve “operational control of the border.” Immigration officials could immediately detain and expel inadmissible migrants who cross over the U.S.-Mexico border or enter the country by other means. Asylum standards would be toughened, and the “Remain in Mexico” policy would be implemented for one year as well. The House bill excludes the Senate bill’s $10B for humanitarian aid and well as $13B in nondefense funding for Ukraine.

 

It’s unclear if the bill will get the support it needs from Republicans in the House for passage. Rep. Don Bacon (R-NE), one of the chief negotiators for the compromise bill, said he intends to discuss it with Speaker Johnson this weekend. Even if it passes the House, passage of this new compromise bill is far from guaranteed in the Senate.

 

Fiscal Year 2024 Appropriations Update

The House and Senate are in recess next week and return the week of February 26 (Senate returns Monday 2/26, the House returns Wednesday 2/28). The current continuing resolutions (CRs) funding the federal government expire on March 1 and March 8. The House has only three days to pass four of the 12 annual spending bills before the March 1 deadline to avoid a government shutdown.

 

The biggest holdup right now are conservative policy riders that staff continue to negotiate. Hardline conservatives are pushing to force a government shutdown or enact a full-year CR in order to try to win these policy fights. Republican Appropriators told the hardliners that a shutdown only hurts House Republicans.

 

Congress may have to pass a fourth CR to extend current spending for FY24 before the March 1 deadline.

 

DHS Secretary Impeachment

The House impeached DHS Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas Tuesday night on a party-line vote, 214-213. This is the first time in nearly 150 years that the House has voted to oust a Cabinet official. The Senate will start the impeachment trial for Mayorkas when the chamber returns from the Presidents Day recess on February 26. Senate President Pro Tempore Patty Murray will oversee the proceedings. No other business can happen on the Senate floor during an impeachment trial. The Senate is likely to avoid the matter entirely as Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) can move to either dismiss the two articles against Mayorkas or refer them to the committee level, effectively tabling the process.

Update on FY24 Appropriations, Border Security Deal, and Tax Bill

The House and Senate are back in session this week and are focused on three main issues: fiscal year 2024 appropriations bills, a border security and Ukraine/Israel/Taiwan supplemental funding deal, and a tax package. Here’s the latest…

 

FY2024 Appropriations

Government funding for veterans, transportation, agriculture and energy programs runs out March 1. Funding for the rest of the government, including the military and the biggest domestic programs, expires March 8. House and Senate leadership reached agreement on an overall funding level for the FY24 bills earlier this year. Appropriators made more progress late Friday when Senate Appropriations Committee Chair Patty Murray (D-WA) and House Appropriations Committee Chair Kay Granger (R-CA) reached a deal on how to allocate the overall $1.66T funding level between the 12 appropriations bills. The chairs had been negotiating these allocations for almost three weeks. This deal allows subcommittee staff to start writing and negotiating their bills. The House is scheduled to be in session 11/14 days, while the Senate is scheduled to be in session 13/17 days before the continuing resolutions (CRs) expire on March 1st/8th.

 

Even if Congress can pass the FY24 appropriations bills by the March deadlines, the fiscal year will be nearly halfway over and agencies will be under pressure to get the money out the door in an expedited timeline. However, they were last confronted with the same challenge in FY2022 when the final bills were enacted on March 15, 2022.

 

Border Security and Ukraine/Israel/Taiwan Supplemental Funding

Senate negotiators said over the weekend that they had reached a deal on border policy changes and are finalizing the last pieces of legislative text. President Biden endorsed the deal framework.

 

One of the negotiators, Sen. Chris Murphy (D-CT), said the deal would give the administration the authority to shut down the border between ports of entry if daily average migrant crossings reach catastrophically high levels (more than 4,000/day). The deal would also speed up the asylum process from 10 years to six months.

 

There is not a timeline for Senate consideration right now, and, even if the Senate can pass the package, resistance from the right will make passage in the House challenging. Former President Trump has called on them to reject anything that is short of a “perfect” deal and House Speaker Mike Johnson (R-LA) has said it would be “dead on arrival” in the House. Sen. Jim Lankford (R-OK), the top GOP negotiator on the deal, pushed back on the attacks saying critics have yet to see the bill. Republicans also are concerned the deal would hand President Biden a “win” in an election year.

 

Republicans have said a border security deal is necessary for them to consider providing $110.5B in supplemental emergency funding for Ukraine, Israel, and Taiwan. If Congress can’t pass the border security-immigration reform part of the deal, it is unclear if Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) will agree to split off the supplemental funding and try to pass it separately in the hopes of pressuring the House to take it up.

 

Tax Package

The House could vote this week on the Tax Relief for American Families and Workers Act that was passed out of the House Ways and Means Committee earlier this month by a vote of 40-3. The $78B bipartisan tax deal could go to the House floor under a rule (requires majority vote for passage) or under suspension of the rules (requires 2/3 majority vote for passage). Suspension allows the House to skip voting on a rule to provide for the bill’s consideration, limits floor debate, and prohibits floor amendments; but it would require a significant number of Democratic votes for passage. New York Republicans in the House have said they won’t vote for the bill if it does not include a provision to lift the state and local tax (SALT) exemption limit.

 

Senate Finance Committee Chair Ron Wyden (D-OR) has not said whether he plans to mark up the bill in Committee or take it straight to the Senate floor for consideration. Wyden may be watching the outcome of the House consideration before making that decision. The bill’s supporters hope a strong showing in the House will put pressure on the Senate to quickly pass the legislation and not succumb to pressure from Senate Republicans who want to make some changes to the legislation.

Fiscal Year 2024 Appropriations Update

The House and Senate have left town for the Thanksgiving recess, but before leaving they passed a short-term continuing resolution (CR). The House passed the CR on Tuesday by a vote of 336-95. Two Democrats and 93 Republicans voted against the measure. The Senate took up the measure last night and passed it by a vote of 87-11. One Democrat and 10 Republicans voted against the CR. The bill now goes to the President who is expected to sign it before the current CR expires tomorrow at midnight.

 

The CR funds the government at current spending levels with some federal agencies funded through January 19 and the rest of the federal government through February 2. The January 19 date covers the Agriculture, Energy and Water, Military Construction-Veterans Affairs, and Transportation HUD spending bills. The February 2 deadline includes the Commerce Justice Science, Defense, Financial Services and General Government, Homeland Security, Interior Environment, Labor HHS Education, Legislative Branch, and State Foreign Operations. The CR also extends the authorization of the Farm bill until September 30, and some public health provisions, national health security provisions, and a special diabetes program through January 19. The bill does not include an emergency funding for Israel or Ukraine.

 

House Republicans had to pull their FY24 Commerce Justice Science appropriations bill from the floor this week after 19 Republicans (and all Democrats) voted against the rule for considering the bill on the House floor. The Republican objectors opposed the bill for not going far enough to cut FBI funding, despite the bill already including a 9% cut. The House then turned to the FY24 Labor HHS Education appropriations bill and adopted 93 amendments, but then abruptly left town for the Thanksgiving break. They aren’t expected to have the votes to pass that bill when they return after the break.

 

While a shutdown has been averted until next year, Congress’ to-do list when they return the week of November 27 includes a number of items. The supplemental funding request for Ukraine, Israel, and Taiwan will require a bipartisan deal on border security. A small group of Senators is continuing discussions over the Thanksgiving break to try to come to agreement on changes to border security policy and funding. The group is hoping to reach an agreement by Thanksgiving. Congress must also complete action on an FAA reauthorization (expires Dec 31), FISA surveillance authorities (expires Dec 31), and the FY24 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). A number of tax and healthcare related items also need to be addressed.

 

Appropriations Subcommittee

House

Senate

Agriculture

Subcommittee: May 18

Full Committee: June 14

Floor: Pulled Sept 28

Full Committee: June 22

Floor: November 1

Commerce Justice Science

Subcommittee: July 14

Full Committee:

Floor: Pulled Nov 14

Full Committee: July 13

Defense

Subcommittee: June 15

Full Committee: June 22

Floor: September 28

Full Committee: July 27

Energy & Water

Subcommittee: June 15

Full Committee: June 22

Floor: October 26

Full Committee: July 20

Financial Services

Subcommittee: June 22

Full Committee: July 13

Floor: Pulled Nov 9

Full Committee: July 13

Homeland Security

Subcommittee: May 18

Full Committee: June 21

Floor: Sept 28

Full Committee: July 27

Interior Environment

Subcommittee: July 13

Full Committee: July 19

Floor: November 3

Full Committee: July 27

Labor HHS Education

Subcommittee: July 14

Full Committee:

Floor: Week of Nov 28

Full Committee: July 27

Legislative Branch

Subcommittee: May 17

Full Committee: June 21

Floor: November 1

Full Committee: July 13

Military Construction VA

Subcommittee: May 17

Full Committee: June 13

Floor: July 27

Full Committee: June 22

Floor: November 1

State Foreign Operations

Subcommittee: June 23

Full Committee: July 12

Floor: Sept 28

Full Committee: July 20

Transportation HUD

Subcommittee: July 12

Full Committee: July 18

Floor: Pulled Nov 7

Full Committee: July 20

Floor: November 1

 

Topline Funding Levels by Appropriations Subcommittee

 

 

Appropriations Subcommittee

FY2023 Enacted

FY2024 House

FY2024 Senate

FY24 Conference

Agriculture

$25.5B

$17.838B

$25.993B

 

Commerce Justice Science

$84.2B

$58.676B

$71.734B

 

Defense

$797.7B

$826.448B

$823.267B

 

Energy & Water

$54.65B

$52.378B

$56.730B

 

Financial Services

$27.6B

$11.311B

$16.95B

 

Homeland Security

$60.7B

$62.793B

$56.923B

 

Interior Environment

$38.9B

$25.417B

$37.850B

 

Labor HHS Education

$226.8B

$147.096B

$195.231B

 

Legislative Branch

$6.9B

$6.746B

$6.761B

 

Military Construction VA

$154.2B

$155.701B

$154.352B

 

State Foreign Operations

$59.7B

$41.367B

$58.358B

 

Transportation HUD

$87.3B

$65.208B

$88.091B

 

 

Fiscal Year 2024 Appropriations Update

 

Crisis averted…for now. Congress passed a continuing resolution (CR) yesterday that keeps the federal government funded through November 17. The CR includes an additional $16B for the FEMA Disaster Relief Fund, but no additional funding for Ukraine. The bill also reauthorizes the Federal Aviation Administration (through December 31) and the National Flood Insurance Program (through November 17), and includes the Animal Drug User Fee Amendments of 2023 and some public health and child and family services programs extenders. The new funding deadline expires right before the House and Senate are scheduled to recess for the Thanksgiving holiday.

 

The House passed the measure by a vote of 335 to 91. Ninety Republicans and one Democrat voted against the measure. The lone Democrat to vote against the bill was Rep. Mike Quigley (D-IL) who called the bill’s lack of funding for Ukraine, “a victory for Putin.” The Senate then took it up and passed it by a vote of 88 to 9. The nine “nay” votes were all from Republicans. The President signed the CR last night enacting it into law.

 

Funding for Ukraine was left out of the CR even though big majorities in both chambers support sending more money. The White House is preparing to send to Congress a full year supplemental funding request for Ukraine in November. Sen. Michael Bennet (D-CO) secured a commitment from Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) to hold a vote on Ukraine aid in the near future. Not specific timeline was laid out. The Senate could use the House-passed bill providing $300M in Ukraine funding that was passed as a show-of-confidence vote after the money was stripped out of the House Defense appropriations bill. The Senate could amend this bill, add additional funding for Ukraine, and send it back to the House.

 

The House was supposed to take a two-week recess beginning October 2. House Republican leaders canceled the planned district recess for the beginning of October and said they will continue to move their own spending bills. They will meet next week to consider the Energy & Water and Legislative Branch appropriations bills on the House floor.

 

Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) announced this morning that he will introduce a motion to remove Speaker Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) from his leadership position. Once the motion to vacate is introduced, the House would have 48 hours to vote on it. Gaetz did not say when he would introduce the motion. Conservative Republicans in the House said they would challenge McCarthy if he relied on Democrats to pass any funding legislation. If they are successful in this effort, Republicans would then need to elect a new Speaker. In any event, this move will eat up valuable floor time that is needed to pass all 12 annual appropriations bills through regular order before the new November 17th deadline.

 

Appropriations Subcommittee

House

Senate

Agriculture

Subcommittee: May 18

Full Committee: June 14

Floor: Pulled

Full Committee: June 22

Commerce Justice Science

Subcommittee: July 14

Full Committee: July 13

Defense

Subcommittee: June 15

Full Committee: June 22

Floor: Sept 28

Full Committee: July 27

Energy & Water

Subcommittee: June 15

Full Committee: June 22

Floor: Week of Oct 2

Full Committee: July 20

Financial Services

Subcommittee: June 22

Full Committee: July 13

Full Committee: July 13

Homeland Security

Subcommittee: May 18

Full Committee: June 21

Floor: Sept 28

Full Committee: July 27

Interior Environment

Subcommittee: July 13

Full Committee: July 19

Full Committee: July 27

Labor HHS Education

Subcommittee: July 14

Full Committee: July 27

Legislative Branch

Subcommittee: May 17

Full Committee: June 21

Floor: Week of Oct 2

Full Committee: July 13

Military Construction VA

Subcommittee: May 17

Full Committee: June 13

Floor: July 27

Full Committee: June 22

State Foreign Operations

Subcommittee: June 23

Full Committee: July 12

Floor: Sept 28

Full Committee: July 20

Transportation HUD

Subcommittee: July 12

Full Committee: July 18

Full Committee: July 20

 

Topline Funding Levels by Appropriations Subcommittee

 

 

Appropriations Subcommittee

FY2023 Enacted

FY2024 House

FY2024 Senate

FY24 Conference

Agriculture

$25.5B

$17.838B

$25.993B

 

Commerce Justice Science

$84.2B

$58.676B

$71.734B

 

Defense

$797.7B

$826.448B

$823.267B

 

Energy & Water

$54.65B

$52.378B

$56.730B

 

Financial Services

$27.6B

$11.311B

$16.95B

 

Homeland Security

$60.7B

$62.793B

$56.923B

 

Interior Environment

$38.9B

$25.417B

$37.850B

 

Labor HHS Education

$226.8B

$147.096B

$195.231B

 

Legislative Branch

$6.9B

$6.746B

$6.761B

 

Military Construction VA

$154.2B

$155.701B

$154.352B

 

State Foreign Operations

$59.7B

$41.367B

$58.358B

 

Transportation HUD

$87.3B

$65.208B

$88.091B

 

 

 

Debt Limit Update

Congress will turn its focus to the debt limit and federal spending when it returns next week. The debt limit – also called the debt ceiling – is the maximum amount of debt that the Department of Treasury can issue to the public or to other federal agencies. The amount is set by law and has been increased or suspended over the years to allow for additional borrowing needed to finance the federal government’s operations. The debt limit was last raised to a total of $31.4 trillion on December 16, 2021. On January 19, 2023, that debt limit was reached, and the Treasury announced a “debt issuance suspension period” during which it can take “extraordinary measures” to borrow additional funds without breaching the debt ceiling. 

 

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen sent a letter to House and Senate leadership on January 24, 2023 in which she wrote that the extraordinary measures would last through June 5, 2023, and urged “Congress to act promptly to protect the full faith and credit of the United States.” April tax receipts could change this outlook.Wrightson ICAP thinks that the end date is more likely the end of July. And the Congressional Budget Office estimates that extraordinary measures will be exhausted sometime between July and September 2023.

 

Since then, there have been a few statements from both sides of the negotiating table and an exchange of letters, but no serious discussions on lifting the debt limit. Behind the scenes, there have been a few recent developments. House Republican leaders have begun informally putting together a debt-limit package they intend to socialize with their members when Congress returns next week. Republicans don’t want to lift the debt limit without spending reductions. 

 

The proposed Republican bill would lift the debt limit until May 2024 in exchange for either a cap on non-defense discretionary spending or a cap on overall discretionary spending after reducing it to FY 2022 levels (i.e. limiting appropriations growth to 1-1.5% annually over the next decade). The Republican proposal also would rescind unspent Covid money, prohibit President Biden’s student loan forgiveness program, repeal some green tax credits that were in last year’s Inflation Reduction Act (P.L. 117-169), institute work requirements for some federal benefit programs (e.g. SNAP), and implement the House Republican energy plan (H.R. 1) and regulation-cutting REINS Act. While Republicans are not planning to touch Social Security or Medicare benefits as promised, Main Street members and others are pushing to include a provision setting up a bipartisan commission to come up with solutions to ensure the long-term solvency of those programs.

 

The Republican proposal would require action by several House committees making passage a difficult process. While it has no chance of passing the Senate, it could jump start negotiations with the White House and Senate. However, Democrats say they won’t bargain on such conditions and are insisting on a clean bill.

 

A congressional stalemate over lifting the debt ceiling could have serious consequences for the U.S. military even if a breach never occurs. Swirling economic uncertainty makes it difficult for the Pentagon and defense industry to execute their long-term plans, and questions over military pay and benefits could discourage people from joining the military amid an ongoing recruiting crisis. More broadly, lawmakers argue that risking a never-before-seen breach would project weakness to adversaries like Russia and China as the U.S. races to aid Ukraine in its war against Russia and deter Chinese aggression.

Inflation Reduction Act

Senate Democrats passed their long-awaited health care, climate and tax bill Sunday afternoon by a vote of 51-50 with Vice President Kamala Harris cast the tie-breaking vote. 
 
The Inflation Reduction Act (H.R. 5376) invests $369B in energy security and climate change and $64B in extending subsidies for the Affordable Care Act. These costs are offset by the expected $725B in new revenue raised from a 15% minimum tax on large corporations, allowing Medicare to negotiate on prescription drug pricing, and increased IRS tax enforcement. The total deficit reduction of the package is approximately $300B.
 
The bill now goes to the House, which plans to take it up on Friday. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) only needs a majority vote, but with a 220 (Democrats) to 210 (Republicans) House she has very little margin for error.

Vantage Point Strategies’ Summary of the Inflation Reduction Act https://drive.google.com/file/d/1yC1jKsmLjX3fHD7btg2vYu4lUmP2uaew/view?usp=sharing 

Senate China Competition-Semiconductor Bill (CHIPS+/CHIPS and Science Act)

The Senate just passed H.R. 4346, the Creating Helpful Incentives to Produce Semiconductors (CHIPS) for America Act by a vote of 64 to 33. The bill now goes to the House who could vote on it this week before they leave for their August recess. If the House passes the bill, it would then go to the President for his signature.

 

The bill is a trimmed-down competitiveness package from a larger bill that passed last year, but stalled in bipartisan, bicameral conference talks. It includes $54.2 billion in five-year grants for semiconductor manufacturing and research, as well as 5G wireless deployment, a 25% tax credit for investments in semiconductor manufacturing facilities through 2026, funding authorization for the National Science Foundation (NSF), and other science-focused measures.

 

Bill Text

https://www.commerce.senate.gov/services/files/CFC99CC6-CE84-4B1A-8BBF-8D2E84BD7965

 

Section-by-Section Summary

https://www.commerce.senate.gov/services/files/1201E1CA-73CB-44BB-ADEB-E69634DA9BB9

 

CHIPS and ORAN Investment Division A Summary

https://www.commerce.senate.gov/services/files/2699CE4B-51A5-4082-9CED-4B6CD912BBC8

 

NSF, NIST, DOC, NASA Division B Summary

https://www.commerce.senate.gov/services/files/6E687DDA-7AA6-4EA8-B9C8-F25E3A0254ED

 

Department of Energy Division B Summary

https://www.commerce.senate.gov/services/files/218906F5-60BE-4EEF-A58C-F50CC0A134E6

Fiscal Year 2023 Appropriations Update

FY2023 Appropriations

This week the House Appropriations Committee began marking up their 12 fiscal year 2023 (FY23) appropriations bills. They began the process before reaching a bipartisan agreement on discretionary spending levels.

 

Negotiations have ground to a halt due to differences over defense vs. nondefense spending and a Republican push to strip earmarks out of the bills. Republicans want large defense spending increases to keep pace with inflation, but will only support flat-funding for nondefense agencies.

 

Appropriations Subcommittee

House Subcommittee Markup

House Full Committee Markup

Senate Subcommittee Markup

Senate Full Committee Markup

Agriculture

June 15, 2022

Bill Text

Summary

Press Release

Earmarks

June 23, 2022

 

 

Commerce Justice Science

June 22, 2022

June 28, 2022

 

 

Defense

June 15, 2022

Bill Text

Summary

Press Release

Earmarks

June 22, 2022

 

 

Energy & Water

June 21, 2022

June 28, 2022

 

 

Financial Services

June 16, 2022

Bill Text

Summary

Press Release

Earmarks

June 24, 2022

 

 

Homeland Security

June 16, 2022

Bill Text

Summary

Press Release

Earmarks

June 24, 2022

 

 

Interior Environment

June 21, 2022

June 29, 2022

 

 

Labor HHS Education

June 23, 2022

June 30, 2022

 

 

Legislative Branch

June 15, 2022

Bill Text

Summary

Press Release

June 22, 2022

 

 

Military Construction VA

June 15, 2022

Bill Text

Summary

Press Release

Earmarks

June 23, 2022

 

 

State Foreign Operations

June 22, 2022

June 29, 2022

 

 

Transportation HUD

June 23, 2022

June 30, 2022

 

 

 

The first six bills hew closely to President Biden’s FY23 budget request. House Democrats set an overall $1.6T discretionary spending cap for the FY23 bills earlier this month. That is about 9% above the FY22 spending cap. Here is how the House FY23 bills compare with FY22 enacted levels.

 

Appropriations Subcommittee

FY2022 Enacted

FY2023 House

FY2023 Senate

Agriculture

$25.125B

$27.2B

 

Commerce Justice Science

$75.8B

 

 

Defense

$728.5B

$761.681B

 

Energy & Water

$54.97B

 

 

Financial Services

$25.5B

$29.8B

 

Homeland Security

$81.1B

$85.67B

 

Interior Environment

$38.0B

 

 

Labor HHS Education

$213.6B

 

 

Legislative Branch

$5.925B

$5.702B

 

Military Construction VA

$284.6B

$314.1B

 

State Foreign Operations

$56.1B

 

 

Transportation HUD

$81.0B

 

 

 

Full Committee markups of the House bills will begin next week and wrap up on June 30. The bills will then go to the House floor for consideration in July.

June 2, 2022 Update from DC

Congress is in recess this week. They will return next week and will be in session for the next three weeks. They will recess again for the weeks of June 27 and July 4.

 

When they return the week of June 6 their focus will be on FY23 appropriations bills, gun control legislation, January 6th insurrection hearings, U.S. Innovation and Competition Act conference negotiations, and legislation on mental health, drug pricing and user fee reauthorizations.

 

Amidst all of this, another thing to keep an eye out for is that the Supreme Court generally releases the majority of its decisions in mid-June.

 

Here’s an update on some of the biggest issues being discussed and negotiated in Congress right now.

 

FY2023 Appropriations

The House will begin marking up their 12 FY2023 appropriations bills in June, with the goal of bringing them to the House floor in July. Senate Appropriators aim to mark up all of their bills in committee in July. The fiscal year ends on September 30. While Congress is unlikely to enact all 12 bills before that deadline, Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Ranking Republican Richard Shelby (R-AL) are both retiring at the end of this Congress and want to complete these bills before they leave DC in December. The chairs and ranking members from the House and Senate Appropriations Committees have met to discuss topline spending figures (defense vs. non-defense spending) with the hopes that this will expedite the appropriations process this year, but they have not yet reached an agreement.

 

Ukraine

Tomorrow marks the 100th day of Vladimir Putin’s war in Ukraine. Since the beginning of the war, the U.S. has committed approximately $4.6 billion in security assistance. Yesterday, the Department of Defense announced an additional $700 million focused on meeting critical Ukrainian needs. Capabilities in this new package include:

 

  • High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems and ammunition;
  • Five counter-artillery radars;
  • Two air surveillance radars;
  • 1,000 Javelins and 50 Command Launch Units;
  • 6,000 anti-armor weapons;
  • 15,000 155mm artillery rounds;
  • Four Mi-17 helicopters;
  • 15 tactical vehicles;
  • Spare parts and equipment.

 

The United States continues to work with its Allies and partners to identify and provide Ukraine with capabilities to meet its evolving battlefield requirements.

 

January 6th Committee Hearings

The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the United States Capitol is expected to begin public hearings on June 9.

 

The committee aims to tell a more complete story of what happened that day and what led to it. Over two weeks of hearings, they intend to showcase what they uncovered in months of work on the events surrounding the attack, such as the more than 1,000 interviews they have conducted and thousands of documents they received from witnesses.

 

The committee may not be able to enforce all their subpoenas before the public hearings begin next week.  They are limited by the number of weeks left in the congressional calendar and the outlook that the House will be under Republican control after the midterm elections.

 

While the committee has not announced the roster of witnesses for the hearing, J. Michael Luttig, a former federal judge and lawyer who advised former Vice President Mike Pence, is expected to testify. Luttig served on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit and was a key behind-the-scenes figure in the lead up to January 6. He provided the Vice President with the legal argument Pence used to reject former President Trump’s order to overturn President Biden’s victory.

 

Gun Control

Today, the House Judiciary Committee is holding a rare recess markup of H.R. 7910, the Protecting Our Kids Act, a large package of gun-control bills. The bill prohibits the sale of certain semiautomatic centerfire rifles or semiautomatic centerfire shotguns to a person under 21, prohibits the sale of “ghost gun” kits without a background check or serial numbers stamped on the parts used in assembling the weapon, boosts penalties for illegal “straw purchases” of guns, makes it a federal offence to import, manufacture or possess large-capacity magazines, creates a grant program to buy back large-capacity magazines, and requires gun owners to store their weapons safely, especially when minors are present. The bill will go to the House floor next week. While the bill has the votes to pass in the House, there is no chance of it overcoming Senate Republican opposition.

 

Yesterday House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) promised to have a hearing and markup of the assault weapons ban at a future date. In the wake of the Uvalde mass shooting, a handful of House Republicans have expressed an openness to banning assault-style rifles.

 

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-MD) has set a vote for next week on a “red flag” bill offered by Rep. Lucy McBath (D-GA), H.R. 2377. That bill calls for the removal of guns from those deemed dangerous to themselves or others. It will be paired with a bill, H.R. 3480, from Rep. Salud Carbajal (D-CA) that encourages states to enact their own red flag laws. Nineteen states currently have such laws.

 

A bipartisan group of senators, led by Sens. Chris Murphy (D-CT) and John Cornyn (R-TX), is negotiating a narrower gun-control package that focuses on state-based red flag programs, school safety, and mental health programs. They met yesterday and hope to have an agreement in place by next week. Sources involved in the negotiations say interest in reaching a compromise remains genuine on both sides. In addition to Murphy and Cornyn, taking part in the discussions were Sens. Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), Bill Cassidy (R-LA), Susan Collins (R-ME), Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Martin Heinrich (D-NM), Joe Manchin (D-WV), Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ), and Pat Toomey (R-PA).