Negotiations on Debt Ceiling and Budget Caps Continue

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Thursday morning that an agreement was reached between the administration and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) on spending levels for FY20 and FY21 as well as a two-year extension of the debt ceiling. Rep. Tom Cole (R-OK) said that the FY20 cap for defense spending would be somewhere between $733B and $750B. 

While both sides agree that there should be offsets for the spending cap increases, they are still discussing the specifics of those offsets. The last bipartisan budget deal included $38B in offsets for $296B in budget cap increases. Last night the Treasury Department sent a “menu” of $574B in spending cuts as well as $516B in savings that can be achieved by freezing spending levels in FY21-FY23. Democrats responded that the $1.1T offered by the White House are nonstarters. The administration wants at least $150B in offsets. This is the most significant final hurdle they need to clear before reaching a deal.

Secretary Mnuchin followed up stating that if they don’t get an agreement done in time, he is advocating for a separate debt ceiling increase. Speaker Pelosi didn’t comment on the Secretary’s statement that an agreement had been reached. The Speaker does want to pass an agreement on the House floor by next Thursday. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) said a final agreement wasn’t locked down yet, but that there was broad agreement on the debt ceiling timeframe. 

What’s also at play is other potential legislative riders that would be attached to the must-pass agreement such as expired tax provisions, whether the $22B needed for the Veterans Choice Program should count against the cap on nondefense spending, a retirement savings bill (H.R. 1994), and a tax technical corrections bill.Speaker Pelosi had said that she would need a deal by the end of this week in order to put it on the House floor next week. The House is scheduled to adjourn for the August recess next Friday. Both sides are continuing negotiations this weekend, but an additional week of work for the House is looking more likely.

Negotiations on Debt Ceiling and Budget Caps Continue

Earlier this week the Bipartisan Policy Center (BPC) released a new forecast for when the Treasury Department will run out of extraordinary measures and can no longer pay its bills in full and on time without Congress raising the debt ceiling. BPC now forecasts the date as potentially early September, but the more likely outcome is early October. BPC’s original forecast in May was for debt default by October or early November. A decline in corporate tax revenue has pushed up these projected dates. Corporate revenue is running about 9% below the previous fiscal year. While BPC’s forecast carries uncertainty, BPC’s message to Congress is that it can’t ignore the forecast and needs to deal with the debt limit before they adjourn for the August recess. Congress is scheduled to return from the August recess on September 9.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin today sent a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) in which he wrote that while “it is impossible to identify precisely how long extraordinary measures will last…” he requests “that Congress increase the debt ceiling before Congress leaves for summer recess.” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) has previously said she would not agree to raise the debt limit before an agreement on spending caps is reached. Progressives in her party are pushing her to use these negotiations to increase non-defense spending and demand action on some House-passed Democratic policies. Without a budget caps deal, an automatic $126B in sequestration cuts would kick in at the end of the year. The Administration would prefer to untangle the debt ceiling issue from the budget caps negotiations. This updated timeline could make linking the two issues more difficult.

On the Senate side, Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard Shelby (R-AL) responded to the new BPC forecast saying that this would accelerate the need for serious negotiations. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) said that he would push to get a bipartisan agreement on raising the debt limit and setting the spending limits for FY20 before the August recess. With respect to the FY20 appropriations bills, Shelby said that his committee won’t markup their FY20 spending bills until there is a budget caps deal. 

The House is scheduled to adjourn on July 26, not leaving much more time for concluding negotiations and passing whatever deal is eventually reached. The Senate is scheduled to be in session through August 2. The House will likely have to add another week of session to get this done before they leave for the August recess.

House and Senate Pass Border Security Emergency Spending Bill

The House was the first to take up the emergency border security spending bill (H.R. 3401) this week. They passed it on Tuesday evening by a vote of 230-195. Four Democrats (Ocasio-Cortez, Omar, Pressley, and Tlaib) voted against the measure and three Republicans (Fitzpatrick, Hurd, and Smith-NJ) voted for it. A manager’s amendment helped get it across the finish line. The amendment limited to 90 days the amount of time unaccompanied migrant children can spend in unlicensed facilities and required new standards and protocols that Customs and Border Protection officials would have to meet to ensure the health and safety of those in its custody. The White House issued a veto threat on the House-passed bill. 

The Senate then took up the House-passed bill. They first voted on the House bill and it failed by a vote of 37-55. Three Democrats voted agains the House-passed bill: Manchin-WV, Markey-MA, and Merkley-OR. The Senate then amended the House bill with its own bill (S. 1900) and passed it by a vote of 84-8. The eight Senators voting against the measure were Hirono (D-HI), Lee (R-UT), Markey (D-MA), Menendez (D-NJ), Merkley (D-OR), Paul (R-KY), Wyden (D-OR), and Van Hollen (D-MD).

The $4.59B bill then returned to the House. Democrats wanted to amend the Senate-passed bill to include more protections for unaccompanied children, but Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) said the Senate would table it. The House finally agreed to accept the Senate-passed version and passed it by a vote of 305-102 (95 Democrats and seven Republicans voted against it). The White House has said that the President will sign the bill. 

 White House RequestSenate BillHouse Bill
Homeland Security   
CBP Processing Centers$273M$793M$787.5M
Migrant Medical Care & Consumables$10M(consumables)$112M$92M (consumables)$20M (medical)
Physical Security$0M$0M$8M
Migrant Transportation$107.681M$35M$35M
Internal TDY/Overtime$80.336M$110M$90.6M
Volunteer Surge Force Reqs$59.434M$0M$5.1M
Countering Human Smuggling and Trafficking$15M$0M$0M
Detainee Medical Care$0M$45M$45M
Integrated Multi-Agency Processing Center Pilot Program$0M$0M$200M
Alternatives to Detention$0M$20M$20M
ICE Detention Beds$260.2M$0M$0M
ICE Family Detention Beds$81.724M$0M$0M
ICE Transportation$33.719M$48M$35.9M (UACs)$12M (Migrants)
BPA Pay and Retention Initiatives$107M$70M$0M
ICE Personnel$61M$0M$0M
HSI Counter-Human Trafficking Operations$0M$21M$0M
Background Investigations$0M$5M$10.2M
IT System Upgrades and Enhancements$10M$50M$50M
FEMA State/Local/Non-Profit Reimbursements for Homeless Migrants$0M$30M$60M
Health and Human Services   
Unaccompanied Children Beds$2.9B$2.88B$2.9B
Department of Defense   
Operation Guardian Support$377M$145M$0M
Department of Justice   
New Immigration Judge Teams/LOP$0M$65M$15M
U.S. Marshals Federal Prisoner Detention$155M$155M$155M

May 2019 OMB Letter to Congress Requesting Additional $4.5B

https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/Pence.pdf

Senate Bill Text

https://www.appropriations.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/FY19%20Border%20Security%20Supplemental%20Appropriations%20Bill%20Text.pdf

Senate Summary

https://www.appropriations.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/FY19%20Border%20Security%20Supplemental%20Appropriations%20Summary.pdf

House Bill Text

https://appropriations.house.gov/sites/democrats.appropriations.house.gov/files/LOWEY_018_xml%202019.6.21.0952.pdf

House Bill Summary

https://appropriations.house.gov/sites/democrats.appropriations.house.gov/files/BORDER%20AID%20SUPPLEMENTAL%20SUMMARY.pdf

House Democratic Fact Sheet

https://appropriations.house.gov/sites/democrats.appropriations.house.gov/files/House%20Border%20Supplemental%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf

House Comparison of House and Senate Bills

https://appropriations.house.gov/sites/democrats.appropriations.house.gov/files/Comparison%20of%20House%20and%20Senate%20Emergency%20Border%20Supplementals.pdf

OMB Statement of Administration Policy on House Emergency Border Bill

https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/saphr3401r_20190624.pdf

CBO Cost Estimate

https://www.cbo.gov/system/files/2019-06/hr3401.pdf

Administration Updates Artificial Intelligence R&D Strategic Plan

On February 11, 2019, President Trump signed Executive Order (EO) 13859, which established the American Artificial Intelligence (AI) Initiative. The EO was in response to Chinese President Xi Jinping announcing that Beijing would invest as much as $150B to become a global leader in AI.

The first directive in the Executive Order was for Federal agencies to prioritize AI research and development (R&D) in their annual budgeting and planning process. Today, the administration released an updated research and development plan for AI technologies that adds to the strategy first published by the Obama Administration in 2016. The National AI R&D Strategic Plan: 2019 Update highlights the key priorities for Federal investment in AI R&D. 

In addition to reaffirming the seven strategies listed in 2016, the plan adds an eighth element calling for expanding public-private partnerships to accelerate advances in artificial intelligence, recognizing that the federal government cannot direct the national effort without collaborating with industry.

The eight strategies included in the plan are:

  • Make long-term investments in artificial intelligence research.
  • Develop effective methods for human-machine collaboration.
  • Understand and address ethical, legal and social implications of the technologies.
  • Ensure safety and security of systems.
  • Share federal, public data for training and testing of technologies.
  • Measure and evaluate technologies using standards.
  • Understand national workforce needs.
  • Expand public-private partnerships.

National Science and Technology Council National AI R&D Strategic Plan

https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/National-AI-Research-and-Development-Strategic-Plan-2019-Update-June-2019.pdf

FY2020 Appropriations Update

The House began consideration of its first FY20 minibus spending package on the floor while the Senate met with the White House to discuss raising overall spending limits for FY20. The House is scheduled to be in session 33 more days before the end of the fiscal year, and the Senate is scheduled to be in session 45 days. 

Senate

The Senate is likely to deem a topline spending level for FY20 if there isn’t a bipartisan agreement on overall spending levels with Democrats and the White House by the end of the July 4threcess. Senate Appropriators would use a “responsible” deemed level to begin action on their 12 annual spending bills in July and then adjust the numbers later after a bipartisan agreement emerges. House Budget Committee Chairman John Yarmuth (D-KY) said that if a two-year budget cap agreement can’t be reached, Democrats would likely accept a one-year agreement.

House

The House began consideration of its four-bill minibus appropriations package (H.R. 2740) this week, which included the Labor HHS Education, Defense, State Foreign Operations, and Energy & Water spending bills. The amendments considered this week focused on the Labor HHS Education and State Foreign Operations sections of the minibus package. They have numerous amendments to consider next week on the Defense and Energy & Water portions of the bill. After they complete consideration of H.R. 2740, the House will then consider a five-bill spending package (H.R. 3055), which includes the Commerce-Justice-Science, Agriculture, Interior, Military Construction-Veterans Affairs, and Transportation-HUD spending bills. 

It is Majority Leader Steny Hoyer’s (D-MD) intention still to finish all 12 spending bills this work period (i.e. before the July 4th recess). Once these two minibus packages are done, the three remaining bills are the Legislative Branch, Homeland Security, and Financial Services bills. The Legislative Branch bill was originally part of H.R. 2740, but was pulled from the minibus package because it contained the first pay raise for Congress since 2009 and put at risk some politically vulnerable Democrats.

White House Statement of Administration Policy on H.R. 2740

https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/SAP_HR-2740.pdf

SubcommitteeFY19 Funding (Enacted)FY20 House 302(b)FY20 Senate 302(b)
Agriculture$23.0B$24.310B 
CJS$64.1B$66.395B 
CJS 2020 Census $7.500B 
Defense$606.5B$622.082B 
DOD OCO $68.079B 
Energy & Water$44.6B$46.413B 
Financial Services$23.4B$24.550B 
Homeland Security$49.4B$49.736B 
Interior$35.6B$37.277B 
Interior Wildfires $2.250B 
Labor HHS Ed$178.1B$191.718B 
Legislative Branch$4.8B$5.010B 
MilCon-VA$97.1B$105.217B 
MilCon-VA OCO $0.921B 
State Foreign Ops$46.2B$48.381B 
State OCO $8.000B 
Transportation HUD$71.1B$75.771B 

Financial Services and General Government

The House Appropriations Committee approved its $24.55B FY20 Financial Services and General Government spending bill and reported it out by a party-line vote of 30-21. The bill is funded at $1.4B above FY19 enacted levels and $355.5M above the President’s FY20 budget request. The bill includes $400M under a discretionary program integrity cap adjustment for the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to fund new and continuing investments to expand and improve the effectiveness of the IRS’ overall tax enforcement program. The Technology Modernization Fund is funded at $35M, far short of the $150M the President requested in his FY20 budget request, but $10M more than what was appropriated in FY19. And, the bill includes a provision to increase Federal civilian pay by 3.1% in 2020.

The bill also removes several preexisting policy riders for the District of Columbia: 

  • Eliminates a ban on the use of local funds for abortion services
  • Eliminates a ban on the use of local funds to legalize marijuana
  • Eliminates a ban on the use of funds for needle exchange programs
  • Eliminates a provision appropriating local District funds

The following amendments to the bill were adopted by the full Committee:

  • Rep. Quigley – The manager’s amendment makes technical and noncontroversial changes to the bill and report. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.
  • Rep. Cuellar – The amendment adds report language on ensuring adequate capacity at land ports of entry for processing of asylum seekers. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.

FY20 Financial Services and General Government Bill Text

https://docs.house.gov/meetings/AP/AP23/20190603/109588/BILLS-116-SC-AP-FY2020-FServices-FY2020FinancialServicesDraftBill.pdf

FY20 Financial Services and General Government Bill Summary

https://appropriations.house.gov/news/press-releases/appropriations-committee-releases-fiscal-year-2020-financial-services-and

FY20 Financial Services and General Government Report Language

https://docs.house.gov/meetings/AP/AP00/20190611/109632/HMKP-116-AP00-20190611-SD003.pdf

OMB Letter to Chairwoman Lowey

https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/FSGG-Lowey.pdf

Homeland Security

The House Appropriations Committee approved its $63.8B FY20 Homeland Security spending bill and reported it out by a vote of 29 to 20. The bill is funded at $2.2B above FY19 enacted levels but $1.9B below the President’s FY20 budget request.

The bill includes no funding for the President’s border wall, additional Border Patrol Agents or Border Patrol checkpoints. It also rescinds $601M from the Customs and Border Protection Procurement, Construction and Improvements account that was appropriated in the FY19 omnibus spending bill. This is the same amount that the President wanted to divert from the Treasury Forfeiture Fund for border wall construction.

The following amendments to the bill were adopted by the full Committee:

  • Rep. Roybal-Allard – The manager’s amendment makes technical and noncontroversial changes to the bill and report. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.
  • Rep. Wasserman Schultz – For a provision in the bill mandating access by Members of Congress to detention facilities for oversight purposes, the amendment strikes a requirement that Members provide 24-hour advance notice. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.
  • Rep. DeLauro – The amendment adds bill language extending the deadline for FEMA to consider the re-submission of a request for Individual Assistance related to the removal of debris from private property for major disasters occurring on or after May 1, 2018, and requiring FEMA to reconsider such re-submissions. The amendment also adds report language requiring FEMA to provide a related briefing to the Committee. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.
  • Rep. Price, cosponsored by Reps. Aguilar, Lee, Pocan – The amendment prohibits the use of funds for various Trump administration policies, including the detention or removal of DACA recipients and certain ICE and CBP raids and other immigration enforcement activities. The amendment was adopted on a vote of 28 to 21.
  • Rep. Cuellar, cosponsored by Rep. Newhouse – The amendment adds bill language authorizing the use of the H-2A program for agricultural jobs that are not temporary or seasonal in nature. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.
  • Rep. Pingree, cosponsored by Reps. Harris, Ruppersberger – The amendment increases the annual cap on H-2B visas. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.

FY20 Homeland Security Bill Text

https://docs.house.gov/meetings/AP/AP15/20190605/109599/BILLS-116-SC-AP-FY2020-HSecurity.pdf

FY20 Homeland Security Bill Summary

https://appropriations.house.gov/news/press-releases/appropriations-committee-releases-fiscal-year-2020-homeland-security-funding

FY20 Homeland Security Report Language

https://docs.house.gov/meetings/AP/AP00/20190611/109632/HRPT-116-FY2020_Homeland_Report.pdf

OMB Letter to Chairwoman Lowey

https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/DHS-Lowey.pdf

FY2020 Appropriations Bills Status

SubcommitteeHouse ActionSenate Action
AgricultureSubcommittee: May 23Full Committee: June 4 
Commerce Justice ScienceSubcommittee: May 17Full Committee: May 22 
DefenseSubcommittee: May 15Full Committee: May 21 
Energy & WaterSubcommittee: May 15Full Committee: May 21 
Financial ServicesSubcommittee: June 3Full Committee: June 11 
Homeland SecuritySubcommittee: June 5Full Committee: June 11 
Interior EnvironmentSubcommittee: May 15Full Committee: May 22 
Labor HHS EducationSubcommittee: April 30Full Committee: May 8  
Legislative BranchSubcommittee: May 1Full Committee: May 9 
Military Construction VASubcommittee: May 1Full Committee: May 9 
State Foreign OperationsSubcommittee: May 10Full Committee: May 16 
Transportation HUDSubcommittee: May 23Full Committee: June 4 

House Select Committee Approves Modernization Package

Last week the House Select Committee on Modernization unanimously approved a bipartisan package of recommendations to improve transparency in the legislative branch. 

The Select Committee was formed in the House Rules adopted by the 116thCongress on January 4, 2019. The committee is led by Chairman Derek Kilmer (D-WA) and Vice Chairman Tom Graves (R-GA). They are tasked with investigating, studying, making findings, holding public hearings, and developing recommendations on modernizing Congress. The recommendations can be on rules to promote a more modern and efficient Congress; procedures; policies to develop the next generation of leaders; staff recruitment, diversity, retention and compensation and benefits; administrative efficiencies including travel and outside services; technology innovation; and the work of the House Commission on Congressional Mailing Standards. 

The five recommendations approved by the committee include:

  1. Adopting one standardized format for drafting, viewing, and publishing legislation to improve transparency and efficiency throughout the lawmaking process.
  2. Providing resources to finish legislation comparison project on schedule and train staff to vastly improve the American public’s ability to understand how amendments change legislation, and the impact of proposed legislation to current law.
  3. Modernizing the lobbying disclosure system to improve the filing process and more easily find and track individual disclosures. 
  4. Developing a centralized, electronic HUB that would list all federal agency and program reauthorization expiration dates, by committee.
  5. Developing a centralized, electronic HUB of committee votes that would be accessible via House.gov and in machine readable format.

The Select Committee does not have legislative jurisdiction, so all recommendations they make will be written into a report and sent to the respective committees of jurisdiction for next steps. The Select Committee plans to offer additional recommendations throughout the remainder of the year.

House Continues Marking Up FY20 Appropriations Bills

The House has marked up and reported out of committee eight of its 12 FY20 annual spending bills, and is on track for reporting out another two when they return from the Memorial Day recess.


Agriculture

The House Agriculture Appropriations Subcommittee approved its $24.31B FY20 spending bill and reported it out by voice vote. The bill is funded at $1B above the FY19 enacted level. The bill includes language blocking the USDA’s proposal to relocate the Economic Research Service (ERS) and the National Institute for Food and Agriculture (NIFA) outside the National Capital Region as well as USDA’s proposal to put ERS, currently under USDA’s research mission area, under the Office of the Chief Economist, which is under the Office of the Secretary. The bill also requires USDA to restore on its website in full all animal welfare and horse protection inspection reports that were taken down weeks after the Trump administration took office.

FY20 Agriculture Bill Text

https://docs.house.gov/meetings/AP/AP01/20190523/109564/BILLS-1161-SC-AP-FY2020-Agriculture-AgricultureRuralDevelopmentFoodandDrugAdministrationandRelatedAgenciesFY2020AppropriationsAct.pdf

FY20 Agriculture Bill Summary

https://appropriations.house.gov/news/press-releases/appropriations-committee-releases-fiscal-year-2020-agriculture-rural-development

Commerce Justice Science

The House Appropriations Committee marked up its $73.9B FY20 Commerce Justice Science spending bill today and reported it out by a party-line vote of 31 to 20. The bill is an increase of $9.78B above FY19 enacted levels. It funds the Department of Commerce at $16.43B ($5.02B above FY19 and $3.96 above the President’s FY20 budget request), the Department of Justice at $32B ($1.07B above FY19), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at $22.32B ($815M above FY19), the National Science Foundation (NSF) at $8.64B ($561.14M above FY19), the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission at $399.5M ($20M above FY19), and the Legal Services Corporation at $550M ($135M above FY19). The bill does not include the additional funding requested by the administration for the NASA 2024 lunar landing. It does include a provision preventing the U.S. Census Bureau from asking about citizenship on the 2020 census questionnaire. 

The committee adopted a manager’s amendment from subcommittee chair Jose Serrano (D-NY), but rejected an amendment from Rep. Aderholt (R-AL) that would have eliminated a $10M pilot program offering legal representation to immigrants entering the country illegally. The committee also defeated an amendment offered by Rep. John Rutherford (R-FL) to allow the Trump administration to include a citizenship question on the 2020 census. And they defeated an amendment offered by Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart (R-FL) to prevent further funding for the transfer or release in the U.S. of suspected terrorists being detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

FY20 Commerce Justice Science Bill Text

https://appropriations.house.gov/sites/democrats.appropriations.house.gov/files/FY2020%20CJS%20Sub%20Markup%20Draft.pdf

FY20 Commerce Justice Science Summary

https://appropriations.house.gov/news/press-releases/appropriations-committee-releases-fiscal-year-2020-commerce-justice-science

FY20 Commerce Justice Science Report

https://docs.house.gov/meetings/AP/AP00/20190522/109552/HMKP-116-AP00-20190522-SD002.pdf

OMB Letter to House Appropriations Chairwoman Lowey

https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/CJS-Lowey-FINAL.pdf

Defense

The House Appropriations Committee approved its FY20 Defense spending bill by a party-line vote of 30 to 22. In total, the bill provides $690.2B for the Department of Defense (DOD), an increase of $15.8B above the FY19 enacted level, and $8B below the President’s budget request. The bill also includes $68.1B in Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) funding. The bill limits DOD’s ability to transfer funds between accounts, which is aimed at the Administration’s plans to move defense funds to pay for a wall on the southern border. It also blocks the sale of the F-35 fighter jet to Turkey. 

The following amendments to the bill were adopted by the full Committee:

  • Rep. Visclosky – The manager’s amendment makes technical and noncontroversial changes to the bill and report. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.
  • Rep. Lee #1 – The amendment repeals the 2001 AUMF after 240 days, giving Congress time to debate and vote on a new AUMF. The amendment was adopted on a party-line vote of 30 – 22.
  • Rep. Ruppersberger #1 – The amendment prohibits funds for cooperation with the Saudi-led coalition in Yemen, with certain exceptions. The amendment was adopted on a vote of 30 – 22.
  • Rep. Fortenberry/Rep. Price – The amendment provides $241.2 million for procurement of equipment to aid in storm recovery at Offutt AFB, Nebraska and two Marine Corps bases in North Carolina, Cherry Point and New River. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.
  • Rep. Lee #3 – Provides that nothing in this Act may be construed as authorizing the use of force against Iran. The amendment was adopted on a vote of 30 – 22.

FY20 Defense Bill Text

https://docs.house.gov/meetings/AP/AP02/20190515/109491/BILLS-116–AP-FY2020-Defense.pdf

FY20 Defense Bill Summary

https://appropriations.house.gov/news/press-releases/appropriations-committee-releases-fiscal-year-2020-defense-funding-bill

FY 20 Defense Report

https://appropriations.house.gov/sites/democrats.appropriations.house.gov/files/FY2020%20Defense%20Report%20Draft.pdf

OMB Letter to House Appropriations Chairwoman Lowey

https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/Defense-Lowey.pdf

Energy & Water

The House Appropriations Committee approved by voice vote its FY20 Energy & Water bill by a vote of 31 to 21. In total, the legislation invests $46.4B in Energy and Water Development programs, an increase of $1.8B from FY19. The bill provides $7.36B for the Army Corps of Engineers (an increase of $357M above FY19 and $2.53B above the FY20 PBR), $1.65B for the Department of the Interior/Bureau of Reclamation (an increase of $82.8M above FY19 level and $528M above the FY20 PBR), $37.1B for the Department of Energy (an increase of $1.4B above the FY19 level and $5.6 billion above the FY20 PBR), $130M for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (which is $95K below the FY19 level), $170M for the Appalachian Regional Commission (an increase of $5M above the FY19 level and the FY20 PBR), and $22M Northern Border Regional Commission (an increase of 10% above the FY19 level and $21 million above the FY20 PBR). The bill prevents the Army Corps funds from being used for a border wall.

The following amendments to the bill were adopted by the full Committee:

  • Rep. Kaptur – The manager’s amendment makes technical and noncontroversial changes to the bill and report. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.
  • Rep. Newhouse #1 – The amendment shifts $5 million between Hanford cleanup accounts. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.

FY20 Energy & Water Bill Text

https://appropriations.house.gov/sites/democrats.appropriations.house.gov/files/FY2020%20E%26W%20Sub%20Markup%20Draft.pdf

FY20 Energy & Water Bill Summary

https://appropriations.house.gov/news/press-releases/appropriations-committee-releases-fiscal-year-2020-energy-and-water-funding-bill

FY20 Energy & Water Report

https://appropriations.house.gov/sites/democrats.appropriations.house.gov/files/FY2020%20E%26W%20Report%20Draft.pdf

OMB Letter to House Appropriations Chairwoman Lowey

https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/EW-Lowey.pdf

Interior, Environment

The House Appropriations Committee approved its FY20 Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies bill by a vote of 30 to 21. In total, the draft bill includes $37.28B, an increase of $1.73B over the FY19 enacted level and $7.24B over the President’s FY20 request. There is also an additional $2.25B of funding provided under the fire suppression cap adjustment. 

The bill provides $523.9M for Land and Water Conservation Fund ($85M above FY19 and $491M above the FY20 PBR), $5.21 billion for Wildland Fire Management ($1.6B above FY19 and $49M above the FY20 PBR), $13.79B for the Department of the Interior ($833M above FY19 and $2.41B above the FY20 PBR), $9.52B for the Environmental Protection Agency ($672M above FY19 and $3.42B above the FY20 PBR), $6.3 billion for the Indian Health Service (an increase of $537M above FY19 and $431M above the FY20 PBR), $167.5M each for the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities, $1.07B for the Smithsonian Institution, $14M for the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, $43.5M for the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, and $61M for the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

The committee adopted a manager’s amendment from subcommittee chair Betty McCollum (D-MN). 

FY20 Interior Bill Text

https://appropriations.house.gov/sites/democrats.appropriations.house.gov/files/FY2020%20Interior%20Sub%20Markup%20Draft.pdf

FY20 Interior Bill Summary

https://appropriations.house.gov/news/press-releases/appropriations-committee-releases-fiscal-year-2020-interior-environment-funding

FY20 Interior Report

https://docs.house.gov/meetings/AP/AP00/20190522/109552/HMKP-116-AP00-20190522-SD003.pdf

OMB Letter to House Appropriations Chairwoman Lowey

https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/Interior-Lowey.pdf

Transportation HUD

The House Transportation HUD Appropriation Subcommittee approved its $137.1BB FY20 spending bill and reported it out by voice vote. The bill is funded at $6B above FY19 enacted levels and $17.3B above the President’s FY20 budget request. The bill includes $75.8B in discretionary funding, an increase of $4.7B over the FY19 enacted level and $17.3B over the President’s FY20 budget request. 

The bill blocks the administration’s public housing rule change on undocumented immigrants in affordable housing, prohibits NHTSA from finalizing a rule that would roll back fuel-economy standards and lead to increased greenhouse gas emissions from vehicles, prohibits future attacks on state meal and rest break laws, and requires all HUD grantees to develop a resiliency plan as part of the consolidated planning process.

FY20 Transportation HUD Bill Text

https://appropriations.house.gov/sites/democrats.appropriations.house.gov/files/FY2020%20THUD%20Sub%20Markup%20Draft.pdf

FY20 Transportation HUD Bill Summary

https://appropriations.house.gov/news/press-releases/appropriations-committee-releases-fiscal-year-2020-transportation-housing-and

FY2020 Appropriations Bills Status

SubcommitteeHouse ActionSenate Action
AgricultureSubcommittee: May 23 
Commerce Justice ScienceSubcommittee: May 17Full Committee: May 22 
DefenseSubcommittee: May 15Full Committee: May 21 
Energy & WaterSubcommittee: May 15Full Committee: May 21 
Financial Services  
Homeland Security  
Interior EnvironmentSubcommittee: May 15Full Committee: May 22 
Labor HHS EducationSubcommittee: April 30Full Committee: May 8  
Legislative BranchSubcommittee: May 1Full Committee: May 9 
Military Construction VASubcommittee: May 1Full Committee: May 9 
State Foreign OperationsSubcommittee: May 10Full Committee: May 16 
Transportation HUDSubcommittee: May 23 

House Continues Marking Up FY20 Appropriations Bills

House

The House has marked up and reported out of committee four of its 12 FY20 annual spending bills, and is on track for reporting out another four by the end of next week.


Commerce Justice Science

The House Commerce Justice Science Appropriations subcommittee marked up its $73.9B FY20 spending bill today and reported it out of subcommittee by voice vote. The bill is an increase of $9.78B above FY19 enacted levels. It funds the Department of Commerce at $16.43B ($5.02B above FY19 and $3.96 above the President’s FY20 budget request), the Department of Justice at $32B ($1.07B above FY19), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at $22.32B ($815M above FY19), the National Science Foundation (NSF) at $8.64B ($561.14M above FY19), the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission at $399.5M ($20M above FY19), and the Legal Services Corporation at $550M ($135M above FY19). The bill does not include the additional funding requested by the administration for the NASA 2024 lunar landing. It does include a provision preventing the U.S. Census Bureau from asking about citizenship on the 2020 census questionnaire. The bill will be marked up in full committee next Wednesday.

FY20 Commerce Justice Science Bill Text

https://appropriations.house.gov/sites/democrats.appropriations.house.gov/files/FY2020%20CJS%20Sub%20Markup%20Draft.pdf

FY20 Commerce Justice Science Summary

https://appropriations.house.gov/news/press-releases/appropriations-committee-releases-fiscal-year-2020-commerce-justice-science

Defense

The House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee approved by voice vote its FY20 spending bill. In total, the bill provides $690.2B for the Department of Defense (DOD), an increase of $15.8B above the FY19 enacted level, and $8B below the President’s budget request. The bill also includes $68.1B in Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) funding. The bill limits DOD’s ability to transfer funds between accounts, which is aimed at the Administration’s plans to move defense funds to pay for a wall on the southern border. It also blocks the sale of the F-35 fighter jet to Turkey. The bill will be marked up in full committee next Tuesday.

FY20 Defense Bill Text

https://docs.house.gov/meetings/AP/AP02/20190515/109491/BILLS-116–AP-FY2020-Defense.pdf

FY20 Defense Bill Summary

https://appropriations.house.gov/news/press-releases/appropriations-committee-releases-fiscal-year-2020-defense-funding-bill

Energy & Water

The House Energy & Water Appropriations Subcommittee approved by voice vote its FY20 bill. In total, the legislation invests $46.4B in Energy and Water Development programs, an increase of $1.8B from FY19. The bill provides $7.36B for the Army Corps of Engineers (an increase of $357M above FY19 and $2.53B above the FY20 PBR), $1.65B for the Department of the Interior/Bureau of Reclamation (an increase of $82.8M above FY19 level and $528M above the FY20 PBR), $37.1B for the Department of Energy (an increase of $1.4B above the FY19 level and $5.6 billion above the FY20 PBR), $130M for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (which is $95K below the FY19 level), $170M for the Appalachian Regional Commission (an increase of $5M above the FY19 level and the FY20 PBR), and $22M Northern Border Regional Commission (an increase of 10% above the FY19 level and $21 million above the FY20 PBR). The bill will be marked up in full committee next Tuesday.

FY20 Energy & Water Bill Text

https://appropriations.house.gov/sites/democrats.appropriations.house.gov/files/FY2020%20E%26W%20Sub%20Markup%20Draft.pdf

FY20 Energy & Water Bill Summary

https://appropriations.house.gov/news/press-releases/appropriations-committee-releases-fiscal-year-2020-energy-and-water-funding-bill

Interior, Environment

The House Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations Subcommittee approved by voice vote its FY20 bill. In total, the draft bill includes $37.28B, an increase of $1.73B over the FY19 enacted level and $7.24B over the President’s FY20 request. There is also an additional $2.25B of funding provided under the fire suppression cap adjustment. 

The bill provides $523.9M for Land and Water Conservation Fund ($85M above FY19 and $491M above the FY20 PBR), $5.21 billion for Wildland Fire Management ($1.6B above FY19 and $49M above the FY20 PBR), $13.79B for the Department of the Interior ($833M above FY19 and $2.41B above the FY20 PBR), $9.52B for the Environmental Protection Agency ($672M above FY19 and $3.42B above the FY20 PBR), $6.3 billion for the Indian Health Service (an increase of $537M above FY19 and $431M above the FY20 PBR), $167.5M each for the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities, $1.07B for the Smithsonian Institution, $14M for the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, $43.5M for the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, and $61M for the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

The bill will be marked up in full committee next Wednesday.

FY20 Interior Bill Text

https://appropriations.house.gov/sites/democrats.appropriations.house.gov/files/FY2020%20Interior%20Sub%20Markup%20Draft.pdf

FY20 Interior Bill Summary

https://appropriations.house.gov/news/press-releases/appropriations-committee-releases-fiscal-year-2020-interior-environment-funding

State Foreign Operations

The House Appropriations full committee approved its FY20 State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs bill by a party-line vote of 29 to 23. In total, the bill provides $56.4B in base discretionary funding—$2.2B above the FY19 enacted level and $13.7B above the President’s FY20 budget request. The funding level includes $8B in OCO funding. The committee rejected the administration’s proposed steep cuts to diplomacy and foreign aid as well as several amendments on abortion, family planning, and climate change policies.

The following amendments to the bill were adopted by the full Committee:

  • Rep. Lowey – The manager’s amendment makes technical and noncontroversial changes to the bill and report. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.
  • Rep. Fortenberry #1 – The amendment includes new language supportive of conservation programs in Kenya. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.
  • Rep. Stewart – The amendment strikes the permissive authority included in the bill to fund the Indo-Pacific Strategy and inserts a directive for $160 million to be made available for implementation of the strategy. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.

FY20 State Foreign Operations Bill Text

https://docs.house.gov/meetings/AP/AP04/20190510/109464/BILLS-116–AP-FY2020-StateForOp-FY2020DepartmentofStateForeignOperationsandRelatedProgramsSubcommitteeBill.pdf

FY20 State Foreign Operations Summary

https://appropriations.house.gov/news/press-releases/appropriations-committee-releases-fiscal-year-2020-state-and-foreign-operations

FY20 State Foreign Operations Report

https://docs.house.gov/meetings/AP/AP00/20190516/109499/HRPT-116-FY2020_SFOPS_Report.pdf

OMB Letter to House Appropriators re: FY20 State Foreign Ops Bill

https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/SFOp-Lowery.pdf

Senate

Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard Shelby (R-AL) initially said he hoped to wait for a bipartisan agreement on new spending caps before advancing his bills. But with no such deal in sight, he said last week he hoped to begin marking up bills this summer if the Senate agrees to “deem” a topline number for discretionary spending, as the House did last month. The Senate may propose topline spending levels that keep discretionary spending flat with FY19 levels. And the Senate could begin marking up as early as June. Senate Homeland Security Appropriations Subcommittee Chairwoman Shelley Moore Capito said she heard that her subcommittee would mark up the third week of June. 

FY2020 Appropriations Bills Status

SubcommitteeHouse ActionSenate Action
Agriculture  
Commerce Justice ScienceSubcommittee: May 17Full Committee: May 22 
DefenseSubcommittee: May 15Full Committee: May 21 
Energy & WaterSubcommittee: May 15Full Committee: May 21 
Financial Services  
Homeland Security  
Interior EnvironmentSubcommittee: May 15Full Committee: May 22 
Labor HHS EducationSubcommittee: April 30Full Committee: May 8  
Legislative BranchSubcommittee: May 1Full Committee: May 9 
Military Construction VASubcommittee: May 1Full Committee: May 9 
State Foreign OperationsSubcommittee: May 10Full Committee: May 16 
Transportation HUD  

House Continues Marking Up FY20 Appropriations Bills

The House Appropriations Committee marked up their Labor HHS Education, Legislative Branch, and Military Construction-Veterans Affairs spending bills in full committee this week, and the State Foreign Operations spending bill in subcommittee. 

Labor HHS Education

The House Appropriations Committee approved the $189.876B FY20 Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies bill and reported it out of committee by a vote of 30 to 23. The legislation includes funding for programs within the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and other related agencies, including the Social Security Administration. The bill provides an increase of $11.8B over the FY19 enacted level and $48B over the President’s FY20 budget request.

The following amendments to the bill were adopted by the full Committee:

  • Rep. DeLauro #1 – The manager’s amendment makes technical and noncontroversial changes to the bill and report. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.
  • Rep. DeLauro #2 – The Chair’s amendment increases funding for several programs by allocating the remaining amount of funding available under the subcommittee allocation. It also includes several bill and report language provisions, including a general provision to maintain support for nonemergency medical transportation services for Medicaid beneficiaries who lack access to transportation to health care facilities. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.
  • Rep. Harris #1 – The amendment directs the Secretary of Homeland Security on how to allocate H-2B visas. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.
  • Rep. Graves – The amendment prohibits funds from being used to replace or diminish the quality of care provided by TRICARE or Medicare. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.
  • Rep. Lee – The amendment prohibits funds from being used to finalize, implement, or enforce a new Trump Administration rule that allows medical professionals and health workers to deny care based on personal beliefs. The amendment was adopted on a vote of 30 to 23.
  • Rep. Harris #3 – The amendment increases funding for the Strategic National Stockpile by $300 million using unobligated balances from the Children’s Health Insurance Program to pay for the increase. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.

FY20 Labor HHS Education Bill Text

https://docs.house.gov/meetings/AP/AP00/20190508/109441/BILLS-116-FC-AP-FY2020-AP00-FY2020Labor-HHS-EducationFullCommitteeDraftBill.pdf

FY20 Labor HHS Education Report

https://docs.house.gov/meetings/AP/AP00/20190508/109441/HRPT-116-FY2020_LHHSED_Report.pdf

OMB Letter to House Chairwoman Lowey re: FY20 Labor HHS Bill

https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/Lowey.pdf

Legislative Branch

The House Appropriations Committee approved their $3.972B FY20 Legislative Branch bill and reported it out of committee by a vote of 28 to 22. The legislation funds the Legislative Branch of the U.S. government, including the U.S. House of Representatives, Congressional Budget Office, and Capitol Police. The bill appropriates $164M more than what was enacted in FY19. It also restarts the Office of Technology Assessment, boosts funding for intern compensation, and permits “Dreamers” to work on the Hill. In keeping with longstanding practice whereby each chamber of Congress determines its own housekeeping requirements and the other concurs without intervention, the House bill does not include funds for the Senate or for Senate office buildings.

FY20 Legislative Branch Bill Text

https://docs.house.gov/meetings/AP/AP00/20190509/109454/BILLS-116-FC-AP-FY2020-AP00-FY2020LegislativeBranch.pdf

FY20 Legislative Branch Report

https://docs.house.gov/meetings/AP/AP00/20190509/109454/HRPT-116-FY2020_LegBranch_Report.pdf

OMB Letter to House Chairwoman Lowey re: FY20 Legislative Branch Bill

https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/letter_fy2020_legislative_branch_appropriations_bill.pdf

Military Construction-Veterans Affairs

The House Appropriations Committee approved the $108.1B FY20 Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies bill and reported it out of committee by a vote of 31 to 21. The legislation funds the Department of Defense, Department of Veterans Affairs, and other related agencies, including the American Battle Monuments Commission and Armed Forces Retirement Home. The bill provides $10.1 billion above the FY19 enacted level. The $108.1B funding level includes $921M in Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) funding as well as $2B for emergency needs related to Hurricanes Michael and Florence at military bases in North Carolina and Florida.

The bill included bill text and report language barring President Trump from using military constructing money to fund his border wall. Rep. Andy Harris (R-MD) offered an amendment during the full committee markup to eliminate this provision. The amendment was defeated by a vote of 22 to 31. Rep. Judge Carter (R-TX) then offered an amendment to add $7.2B to the bill for border security. His amendment also was defeated by a vote of 21 to 31. This language is unlikely to survive in the Senate, and is specifically called out in Acting OMB Director Russell Vought’s letter to House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita Lowey (D-NY). 

FY20 Military Construction-Veterans Affairs Bill Text

https://docs.house.gov/meetings/AP/AP00/20190509/109454/BILLS-116–AP-FY2020-AP00-FY2020MilitaryConstructionandVeteransAffairs.pdf

FY20 Military Construction-Veterans Affairs Report

https://docs.house.gov/meetings/AP/AP00/20190509/109454/HRPT-116-FY2020_MILCON_Report.pdf

OMB Letter to House Chairwoman Lowey re: FY20 MilCon-VA Bill

https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/letter_fy2020_militaryconstruction_va_appropriations_bill.pdf

State Foreign Operations

The House Appropriations Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs approved its FY20 bill by voice vote. In total, the bill provides $56.4B in base discretionary funding—$2.2B above the FY19 enacted level and $13.7B above the President’s FY20 budget request. The funding level includes $8B in OCO funding. The committee rejected the administration’s proposed steep cuts to diplomacy and foreign aid. The bill next heads to the full Committee for markup.

FY20 State Foreign Operations Bill Text

https://docs.house.gov/meetings/AP/AP04/20190510/109464/BILLS-116–AP-FY2020-StateForOp-FY2020DepartmentofStateForeignOperationsandRelatedProgramsSubcommitteeBill.pdf

FY2020 Appropriations Bills Status

SubcommitteeHouse ActionSenate Action
Agriculture  
Commerce Justice Science  
DefenseSubcommittee: May 15 
Energy & Water  
Financial Services  
Homeland Security  
Interior Environment  
Labor HHS EducationSubcommittee: April 30Full Committee: May 8  
Legislative BranchSubcommittee: May 1Full Committee: May 9 
Military Construction VASubcommittee: May 1Full Committee: May 9 
State Foreign OperationsSubcommittee: May 10 
Transportation HUD  

House Begins Work on FY20 Appropriations Bills

The House kicked off the FY20 appropriations process this week and marked up three of their annual spending bills. All bills are expected to be marked up in the full committee next week. On the Senate side, Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard Shelby (R-AL) said that he is waiting to see if congressional leaders can reach agreement on the spending caps before he starts marking up the FY20 spending bills.

 FY19 EnactedFY20 (Cap)FY20 President’s Budget RequestFY20 House Budget CommitteeFY21 (Cap)FY21 House Budget Committee
Defense$647.0B$576.2B$576.0B$664.0B$590.1B$680.119B
OCO & Emergency Defense$69.0B $174.0B$69.0B $69.0B
Total Defense$716.0B$576.2B$750.0B$733.0B$590.1B$749.119B
       
Non-Defense$597.0B$542.1B$543.0B$631.018B$554.6B$646.056B
OCO Non-Defense$8.0B  $8.0B $8.0B
Disaster Relief$12.0B $19.0B   
Program Integrity Init.$1.897B $2.0B   
Emergency Require.$1.68B     
Wildfire Suppression  $2.0B   
Total Non-Defense$620.577B$542.1B$567.0B$639.018B$554.6B$654.056B

Labor HHS Education

The House Labor HHS Education Appropriations Subcommittee marked up its FY20 spending bill this week and passed it out of subcommittee by voice vote that appeared to be along party lines. 

The bill provides $189.8B in discretionary funding; an increase of $11.7B over FY19 enacted levels and $47.8B over the President’s FY20 budget request. The Department of Labor is funded at $13.3B ($1.2B above FY19 and $2.4B above the President’s budget request), the Department of Health and Human Services is funded at $99.0B ($8.5B above FY19 and $20.9B above the President’s budget request), and the Department of Education is funded at $75.9B ($4.4B above FY19 and $11.9B above the President’s budget request). The bill also provides $1.14B for the Corporation for National and Community Service, $495M for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, $257M for the Institute of Museum and Library Services, $342M for the National Labor Relations Board, and $13B for the Social Security Administration’s operating expenses.

Bill Text

https://appropriations.house.gov/sites/democrats.appropriations.house.gov/files/FY2020%20LHHS%20Sub%20Markup%20Draft.pdf

Summary

https://appropriations.house.gov/news/press-releases/appropriations-committee-releases-fiscal-year-2020-labor-hhs-education-funding

Legislative Branch

The House Legislative Branch Appropriations Subcommittee marked up its FY20 spending bill in subcommittee this week and also approved it by a party line voice vote. 

The bill appropriates $3.943B for the legislative branch, $135M or 3.6% above FY19. In keeping with longstanding practice whereby each chamber of Congress determines its own requirements and the other concurs without intervention, the bill does not include funds for the Senate or for Senate office buildings. 

The bill includes an $11M funding increase to allow Congressional offices to pay their interns. It also restores the Office of Technology Assessment, which helps Congress understand the potential and the risks of technology developments and the policy options for addressing issues those developments raise. The bill also includes funding for the Government Accountability Office (GAO) (a $26M increase), the Architect of the Capitol (a $26M decrease), the Capitol Police (a $7M increase), and the Library of Congress (a $24M increase). Finally, the bill includes language permitting the Legislative Branch agencies to employ “Dreamers” – residents of the U.S. brought to the U.S. as children without proper immigration status – who hold employment authorization under the DACA program.

Bill Text

https://appropriations.house.gov/sites/democrats.appropriations.house.gov/files/FY2020%20Leg%20Branch%20Sub%20Markup%20Draft.pdf

Summary

https://appropriations.house.gov/sites/democrats.appropriations.house.gov/files/FY2020%20Leg%20Branch%20Sub%20Markup%20Draft.pdf

Military Construction-Veterans Affairs

The House Military Construction-Veterans Affairs (MilCon-VA) Appropriations Subcommittee marked up its FY20 funding bill this week and approved it by voice vote (mostly along party line votes as Ranking Member Granger voted no, but Rep. Carter voted yes). 

The bill funds the Department of Defense, Department of Veterans Affairs, and other related agencies, including the American Battle Monuments Commission and Armed Forces Retirement Home. In total, the legislation provides $108.1B in discretionary funding – $10B above the FY19 enacted level. This includes $921M in Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) funding as well as $2B for emergency needs related to Hurricanes Michael and Florence at military bases in North Carolina and Florida.

Within this total, discretionary funding for the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is increased by $7.8B (9%) over the FY19 enacted level, including funding to increase access to services for veterans, and to increase oversight and accountability within the department. Funding for military construction is 

Bill Text

https://appropriations.house.gov/sites/democrats.appropriations.house.gov/files/FY2020%20MilCon-VA%20Sub%20Markup%20Draft.pdf

Summary

https://appropriations.house.gov/news/press-releases/appropriations-committee-releases-fiscal-year-2020-military-construction

FY2020 Appropriations Bills Status

SubcommitteeHouse ActionSenate Action
Agriculture  
Commerce Justice Science  
DefenseSubcommittee: May 15 
Energy & Water  
Financial Services  
Homeland Security  
Interior Environment  
Labor HHS EducationSubcommittee: April 30  
Legislative BranchSubcommittee: May 1  
Military Construction VASubcommittee: May 1 
State Foreign Operations  
Transportation HUD