House and Senate Complete Action on FY2019 Spending Bills

The House and Senate voted today on an FY19 appropriations conference report that includes the seven remaining spending bills. The Senate took up H.J. Res. 31 first and passed it by a vote of 83-16. The no votes were from Sens. Booker (D-NJ), Braun (R-IN), Cotton (R-AR), Cruz (R-TX), Gillibrand (D-NY), Harris (D-CA), Hawley (R-MO), Inhofe (R-OK), Lee (R-UT), Markey (D-MA), Paul (R-KY), Rubio (R-FL), Sasse (R-NE), Scott (R-SC), Toomey (R-PA), and Warren (D-MA). The House followed and passed the bill by a vote of 300 to 128. Nineteen Democrats and 109 Republicans voted against the measure.

The conference report included the Agriculture, Commerce-Justice-Science, Financial Services, Homeland Security, Interior-Environment, State-Foreign Operations, and Transportation-HUD FY19 spending bills. 

In order to get a final deal, conferees had to give up on including several other provisions that members were seeking, such as securing back pay for federal contractors who lost work during the 35-day partial shutdown, reauthorizing the Violence Against Women Act, retroactively extending expired tax credits, and stopping automatic spending cuts to mandatory programs under the 2010 pay-as-you-go law. 

The bill now goes to the President for his signature. President Trump indicated earlier today that he will declare an emergency in order to allow the administration to redirect funds to fund a wall on the southwest border. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) said they would support this move by the President. Not all Senate Republicans, including Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn (R-TX) are on board with an emergency declaration as it sets a dangerous precedent and undermines the role of Congress. House Armed Services Committee Ranking Republican Mac Thornberry (R-TX) encouraged the President not to divert significant Department of Defense funding for border security as it would have detrimental consequences for our troops and military infrastructure. House Democrats could pass legislation to block the President’s emergency declaration. They could also sue the President and challenge his emergency declaration in court. Republicans sued then-President Barack Obama in 2014 over the Affordable Care Act. It was the first time a district-court judge affirmed the right of the House of Representatives, as an institution, to sue a sitting President. 

Bill Text

https://docs.house.gov/billsthisweek/20190211/CRPT-116hrpt9_u2-.pdf

Joint Explanatory Statement

https://docs.house.gov/billsthisweek/20190211/116hrpt9-JointExplanatoryStatement-u1.pdf

House Democrat Summary

https://appropriations.house.gov/sites/democrats.appropriations.house.gov/files/documents/Summary%20of%20Conference%20Report.pdf

Senate Democrat Summary

https://www.appropriations.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/Minibus%2019.pdf

Senate Republican Summary

https://www.appropriations.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/021319%20Combined%20Bill%20Summary.pdf

House and Senate Conferees to Continue Negotiations This Weekend on FY19 Homeland Security Spending

House and Senate negotiators are planning to work through the weekend to reach a border security deal that would clear the way for a final FY19 spending package. 

The conferees held a closed-door briefing on Wednesday with Customs and Border Protection officials as well as Carla Provost, Chief of U.S. Border Patrol. According to the White House, the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) briefer was not allowed in to the briefing room. (https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/washington-times-ice-shut-border-talks-warns-democrats-plans-free-thousands-criminals/)

Details on how much funding and what type of construction would be allowed as barriers along the border are still being negotiated.

A disaster supplemental may be included in the final deal. Earlier this year, the House passed a $14.2B aid package for victims of hurricanes, wildfires, typhoons and other recent natural disasters. Senate Republicans introduced their own $12.8B package, but it hasn’t been considered on the Senate floor.

The conferees’ goal is to produce legislative text on Monday. They have been told to stay in town this weekend to be able to sign a conference report. Some members of the conference committee – Reps. Cuellar (D-TX), Fleischmann (R-TN), and Graves (R-GA) – are among those in a bipartisan group heading to Camp David this evening to discuss the 2019 legislative agenda with Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney.

The question is whether or not President Trump will sign what the conferees produce. Democratic leaders have expressed concerns about this pointing to previous reversals by the President including his most recent refusal to sign a six-week stopgap in December, which led to the 35-day partial government shutdown. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) dismissed those concerns saying that the President would sign it if there is a deal and there are enough bipartisan votes for it to pass. And Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard Shelby (R-AL) met with the President this week. He said that the President urged him to get a deal done, and that he thinks the President would sign a final bill.

Congress must pass a final spending package or another continuing resolution by February 15 in order to avoid another shutdown. 

House and Senate Delay FY19 Appropriations with New CR

The current FY19 appropriations continuing resolution (CR) was set to expire at midnight tonight. While legislative action was largely paused this week for memorial services for former President George H.W. Bush, the House and Senate were able to clear another CR funding the remaining seven appropriations bills through December 21. The House cleared the new CR through a unanimous consent agreement, and the Senate followed passing it by voice vote. The President signed it into law today.

The CR also extends a number of expiring authorizations including the National Flood Insurance Program, the Violence Against Women Act, and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families

The President’s FY19 budget request submitted to Congress in February of this year requested $1.6B for 65 miles of new border wall system in southern Texas. The Senate has included $1.6B in their FY19 Homeland Security appropriations bill. The President informally increased the request to $5B in a meeting with congressional Republicans in June. A formal budget amendment with details of how the $5B would be spent has not been submitted to Congress. The House included $5B in their FY19 Homeland Security appropriations bill. Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard Shelby (R-AL) has proposed a down payment of $2.5B for the border wall in FY19 followed by another $2.5B in FY20. President Trump has threatened to veto any spending measure that does not include $5B for the wall.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) said that Democrats would support one of two options – either an omnibus with the seven remaining bills with the Homeland bill including $1.6B for the wall or a spending package that includes six of the seven remaining FY19 appropriations bills and a full-year CR for the Department of Homeland Security. Schumer and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) are scheduled to meet with President Trump on Tuesday.

The administration has also submitted to Congress a four-page list that includes $4.76B in FY19 funding anomalies that they would like to see funded in the final FY19 spending bill. These new spending requests include funding for national security reviews of foreign purchases by U.S. businesses, to help combat more frequent wildfire outbreaks, and to care for unaccompanied migrant children in custody. How Congress will be able to accommodate these new funding requests given the funding caps is unclear. The remaining seven House bills are already $736M above their nondefense spending cap for FY19.

FY2019 Full-Year Funding Anomalies Requested by Trump Administration

http://www.vantagepointstrat.com/anomalies/

Subcommittee House Action Senate Action Conference
Agriculture Subcommittee: May 9

Full Committee: May 16

Subcommittee: May 22

Full Committee: May 24

Floor: August 1

 
Commerce Justice Science Subcommittee: May 9

Full Committee: May 17

Subcommittee: June 12

Full Committee: June 14

 
Defense Subcommittee: June 7

Full Committee: June 13

Floor: June 28

Subcommittee: June 26

Full Committee: June 28

Floor: August 23

House Floor: Sept. 26

Senate Floor: Sept. 18

Signed Into Law: Sept. 28 (P.L. 115-245)

Energy & Water Subcommittee: May 7

Full Committee: May 16

Floor: June 8

Subcommittee: May 22

Full Committee: May 24

Floor: June 25

House Floor: Sept. 12

Senate Floor: Sept. 13

Signed Into Law: Sept. 21 (P.L. 115-244)

Financial Services Subcommittee: May 24

Full Committee: June 13

Floor: July 19

Subcommittee: June 19

Full Committee: June 21

Floor: August 1

 
Homeland Security Subcommittee: July 19

Full Committee: July 25

Subcommittee: June 19

Full Committee: June 21

 
Interior Environment Subcommittee: May 15

Full Committee: June 6

Floor: July 19

Subcommittee: June 12

Full Committee: June 14

Floor: August 1

 
Labor HHS Education Subcommittee: June 15

Full Committee: July 11

Subcommittee: June 26

Full Committee: June 28

Floor: August 23

House Floor: Sept. 26

Senate Floor: Sept. 18

Signed Into Law: Sept. 28 (P.L. 115-245)

Legislative Branch Subcommittee: April 26

Full Committee: May 8

Floor: June 8

Full Committee: June 14

Floor: June 25

House Floor: Sept. 12

Senate Floor: Sept. 13

Signed Into Law: Sept. 21 (P.L. 115-244)

Military Construction VA Subcommittee: April 26

Full Committee: May 8

Floor: June 8

Subcommittee: June 5

Full Committee: June 7

Floor: June 25

House Floor: Sept. 12

Senate Floor: Sept. 13

Signed Into Law: Sept. 21 (P.L. 115-244)

State Foreign Operations Subcommittee: June 13

Full Committee: June 20

Subcommittee: June 19

Full Committee: June 21

 
Transportation HUD Subcommittee: May 16

Full Committee: May 23

Subcommittee: June 5

Full Committee: June 7

Floor: August 1

 

Status of Border Wall Funding and Remaining FY19 Appropriations Bills

Talk has turned to Congress passing another continuing resolution (CR) funding the remaining seven FY19 appropriations bills through December 14. The current CR expires on December 7. Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard Shelby (R-AL) said that some in Congress are pushing for a long-term CR through next September. But this may just be “talk” designed to increase political pressure for a final spending deal as a full-year homeland security CR would provide only $1.57B for the border wall (the amount from the FY18 Homeland Security appropriations bill).

This week Republicans proposed a plan that would provide $5B over two years for the President’s border wall – $2.5B in FY19 and $2.5B in FY20. Democrats have rejected this proposal. The Senate Homeland appropriations bill includes $1.6B for the wall compared to the House bill, which includes $5B (the President’s FY19 requested amount). President Trump told Republican leaders that he is adamant about getting $5B in FY19 as a down payment on the wall, and that he would veto any measure that provides only $1.6B for it.

Another obstacle could come from Senate Democrats, who are pushing to include a provision in the final spending bill to protect special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s investigation from interference, if Republican leaders don’t allow a vote on a separate bill.

Subcommittee House Action Senate Action Conference
Agriculture Subcommittee: May 9

Full Committee: May 16

Subcommittee: May 22

Full Committee: May 24

Floor: August 1

 
Commerce Justice Science Subcommittee: May 9

Full Committee: May 17

Subcommittee: June 12

Full Committee: June 14

 
Defense Subcommittee: June 7

Full Committee: June 13

Floor: June 28

Subcommittee: June 26

Full Committee: June 28

Floor: August 23

House Floor: Sept. 26

Senate Floor: Sept. 18

Signed Into Law: Sept. 28 (P.L. 115-245)

Energy & Water Subcommittee: May 7

Full Committee: May 16

Floor: June 8

Subcommittee: May 22

Full Committee: May 24

Floor: June 25

House Floor: Sept. 12

Senate Floor: Sept. 13

Signed Into Law: Sept. 21 (P.L. 115-244)

Financial Services Subcommittee: May 24

Full Committee: June 13

Floor: July 19

Subcommittee: June 19

Full Committee: June 21

Floor: August 1

 
Homeland Security Subcommittee: July 19

Full Committee: July 25

Subcommittee: June 19

Full Committee: June 21

 
Interior Environment Subcommittee: May 15

Full Committee: June 6

Floor: July 19

Subcommittee: June 12

Full Committee: June 14

Floor: August 1

 
Labor HHS Education Subcommittee: June 15

Full Committee: July 11

Subcommittee: June 26

Full Committee: June 28

Floor: August 23

House Floor: Sept. 26

Senate Floor: Sept. 18

Signed Into Law: Sept. 28 (P.L. 115-245)

Legislative Branch Subcommittee: April 26

Full Committee: May 8

Floor: June 8

Full Committee: June 14

Floor: June 25

House Floor: Sept. 12

Senate Floor: Sept. 13

Signed Into Law: Sept. 21 (P.L. 115-244)

Military Construction VA Subcommittee: April 26

Full Committee: May 8

Floor: June 8

Subcommittee: June 5

Full Committee: June 7

Floor: June 25

House Floor: Sept. 12

Senate Floor: Sept. 13

Signed Into Law: Sept. 21 (P.L. 115-244)

State Foreign Operations Subcommittee: June 13

Full Committee: June 20

Subcommittee: June 19

Full Committee: June 21

 
Transportation HUD Subcommittee: May 16

Full Committee: May 23

Subcommittee: June 5

Full Committee: June 7

Floor: August 1

 

 

FY2018 Intelligence Funding Levels Released

Intelligence spending in the U.S. is a combination of the National Intelligence Program (NIP) and the Military Intelligence Program (MIP). The NIP supports strategic planning and policymaking and is comprised of four defense NIP programs and eight nondefense NIP programs. The MIP supports military operational and tactical levels of planning and operations and is comprised of 10 MIP programs. Six U.S. intelligence community (IC) components have both MIP and NIP funding sources.

While the Pentagon and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) do not publicly detail how they spend the billions they are appropriated each year for intelligence, they do release two figures each year: how much they requested and how much Congress approved.

This week the Pentagon announced that the FY18 appropriations for the MIP (including Overseas Contingency Operations funding) was $22.1B, an increase of 20% over the FY17 funding level of $18.4B. The administration had requested $20.7B for FY18.

The ODNI said that the NIP budget for FY18 was $59.4B, up 8.7% from the FY17 funding level of $54.6B. The administration had requested $57.7B for FY18.

Committee Leadership and Membership in the 116th Congress

Retirements, higher office ambitions, promotions, primary losses, and (potential) general election losses will have an impact on committee membership and leadership in the 116thCongress. Leadership elections could also have an effect. Senate Commerce Committee Chairman John Thune (R-SD) is widely expected to become Majority Whip if Republicans hold their majority in the Senate. If that does happen, Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS) is the presumptive successor to take that committee’s gavel.

This week House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) said that if Democrats win control of the House in the midterm elections that she expects all of the ranking members on House committees will become chairs of those committees in the 116th Congress (2019-2020). In addition to the House potentially flipping, there are 55 members (18 Democrats and 37 Republicans) who are not seeking re-election to their House seat in 2018. In the Senate, there are only three Republican members (Hatch-UT, Flake-AZ, and Corker-TN) who are retiring at the end of this Congress. Hatch is currently the chair of the Senate Finance Committee. Sen. Grassley (R-IA) is next in line for that gavel, but he may opt to keep his chair of the Judiciary Committee. If he does stay at Judiciary, Sen. Crapo (R-ID) is the next most senior Republican. Sen. Corker is the chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Sen. Risch (R-ID) is the next most senior Republican on that committee.

To help you keep track of all of these potential committee changes, Vantage Point Strategies updated its House and Senate committee charts indicating members who are retiring, lost in their primary, or are running for higher office. Also noted are committee chairs that are term limited at the end of 2018 as well as members who have previously been the chairs of those committees and, thus, are not eligible to be chairman again. Only Republicans have term limits for committee chairs. In the House, members are limited to a total of six years as chair or ranking member. In the Senate, Republican senators can serve six years as chair andsix years as ranking member.

In the Senate, there are a number of Republican chairs that will reach their six-year limit at the end of 2020 (if Republicans retain control of the Senate in the 116thCongress). Of these chairs, the following are also up for re-election in 2020: Roberts (R-KS), Enzi (R-WY), Alexander (R-TN), and Collins (R-ME). Term limits may or may not be a factor in their re-election decision.

House Committees

http://www.vantagepointstrat.com/115th-congress-house-committees-10-16-18/

Senate Committees

http://www.vantagepointstrat.com/115th-congress-senate-committees-10-17-18/

Remaining Seven FY19 Appropriations Bills – On Hold Until Lame Duck Session

When the House and Senate return on November 13 they will have seven of their 12 FY19 appropriations bills to complete work on before the continuing resolution funding these bills expires on December 7. The biggest unknown at this time is how the fight over border wall funding will play out.

The FY19 Homeland Security Appropriations bill was marked up and reported out of the House and Senate appropriations committees earlier this year, but didn’t see floor action. The House bill includes $5B for the southwest border wall while the Senate bill only provides $1.6B for the wall. The President wants a $5B down payment on his proposed wall in FY19. House and Senate appropriators may be working on a compromise that would fall between the $1.6B and $5B.

The outcome of the November 6 midterm elections could have an effect on the lame duck spending negotiations. If Democrats win either or both chambers of Congress, they could push for a spending delay into the new calendar year. But Republican leaders have promised the President that he will get his border wall funding by December. And Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) hasn’t ruled out a partial government shutdown if Congress can’t pass the remaining spending bills.

Earlier this week Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard Shelby (R-AL) said that while he is not against the wall, he just hopes “what we do is wise, you know, the way we spend our money.” The Senate will need support from Democrats to pass the spending bills in their chamber.

FY2019 Appropriations Bills Status

Subcommittee House Action Senate Action Conference
Agriculture Subcommittee: May 9

Full Committee: May 16

Subcommittee: May 22

Full Committee: May 24

Floor: August 1

 
Commerce Justice Science Subcommittee: May 9

Full Committee: May 17

Subcommittee: June 12

Full Committee: June 14

 
Defense Subcommittee: June 7

Full Committee: June 13

Floor: June 28

Subcommittee: June 26

Full Committee: June 28

Floor: August 23

House Floor: Sept. 26

Senate Floor: Sept. 18

Signed Into Law: Sept. 28  (P.L. 115-245)

Energy & Water Subcommittee: May 7

Full Committee: May 16

Floor: June 8

Subcommittee: May 22

Full Committee: May 24

Floor: June 25

House Floor: Sept. 12

Senate Floor: Sept. 13

Signed Into Law: Sept. 21  (P.L. 115-244)

Financial Services Subcommittee: May 24

Full Committee: June 13

Floor: July 19

Subcommittee: June 19

Full Committee: Jun 21

Floor: August 1

 
Homeland Security Subcommittee: July 19

Full Committee: July 25

Subcommittee: June 19

Full Committee: Jun 21

 
Interior Environment Subcommittee: May 15

Full Committee: June 6

Floor: July 19

Subcommittee: June 12

Full Committee: June 14

Floor: August 1

 
Labor HHS Education Subcommittee: June 15

Full Committee: July 11

Subcommittee: June 26

Full Committee: June 28

Floor: August 23

House Floor: Sept. 26

Senate Floor: Sept. 18

Signed Into Law: Sept. 28 (P.L. 115-245)

Legislative Branch Subcommittee: April 26

Full Committee: May 8

Floor: June 8

Full Committee: June 14

Floor: June 25

House Floor: Sept. 12

Senate Floor: Sept. 13

Signed Into Law: Sept. 21  (P.L. 115-244)

Military Construction VA Subcommittee: April 26

Full Committee: May 8

Floor: June 8

Subcommittee: June 5

Full Committee: June 7

Floor: June 25

House Floor: Sept. 12

Senate Floor: Sept. 13

Signed Into Law: Sept. 21  (P.L. 115-244)

State Foreign Operations Subcommittee: June 13

Full Committee: June 20

Subcommittee: June 19

Full Committee: Jun 21

 
Transportation HUD Subcommittee: May 16

Full Committee: May 23

Subcommittee: June 5

Full Committee: June 7

Floor: August 1

 

 

Congress Passes and President Signs 2nd Minibus Appropriations Package

Defense, Labor HHS Education

The House on Wednesday passed an $854B spending bill funding the Defense and Labor HHS Education FY19 spending bills while pushing the funding deadline for the remaining seven FY19 spending bills until December 7. The bill passed by a vote of 361-61, a week after the Senate passed it by a vote of 93-7. Five democrats and 56 republicans voted against the measure in the House. The President signed the bill into law today. For the first time in 22 years, five of the 12 annual spending bills became law on time.

Defense and Labor HHS Education Conference Report Text

https://docs.house.gov/billsthisweek/20180910/CRPT-115hrpt952.pdf

Defense and Labor HHS Education Joint Explanatory Statement

https://docs.house.gov/billsthisweek/20180910/Joint%20%20Statement.pdf

Interior-Environment, Financial Services, Agriculture, Transportation HUD

House and Senate negotiators were not able to reach agreement on a four-bill minibus spending package that includes the Interior, Financial Services, Agriculture, and Transportation-HUD FY19 spending bills. Negotiations were held up because of policy disputes over environmental regulations, a pay raise for federal employees, the regulation of meat produced from animal cells, and whether to wall off certain funds from being spent before budget deficits are eliminated. A final agreement will now have to wait until after the House returns November 13. In the meantime, the agencies funded in these four spending bills will be funded through December 7 under the continuing resolution included in the Defense and Labor HHS Education minibus spending bill that was signed into law today.

FY2019 Appropriations Bills Status

Subcommittee House Action Senate Action Conference
Agriculture Subcommittee: May 9

Full Committee: May 16

Subcommittee: May 22

Full Committee: May 24

Floor: August 1

 
Commerce Justice Science Subcommittee: May 9

Full Committee: May 17

Subcommittee: June 12

Full Committee: June 14

 
Defense Subcommittee: June 7

Full Committee: June 13

Floor: June 28

Subcommittee: June 26

Full Committee: June 28

Floor: August 23

House Floor: Sept. 26

Senate Floor: Sept. 18

Signed Into Law: Sept. 28

Energy & Water Subcommittee: May 7

Full Committee: May 16

Floor: June 8

Subcommittee: May 22

Full Committee: May 24

Floor: June 25

House Floor: Sept. 12

Senate Floor: Sept. 13

Signed Into Law: Sept. 21

Financial Services Subcommittee: May 24

Full Committee: June 13

Floor: July 19

Subcommittee: June 19

Full Committee: Jun 21

Floor: August 1

 
Homeland Security Subcommittee: July 19

Full Committee: July 25

Subcommittee: June 19

Full Committee: Jun 21

 
Interior Environment Subcommittee: May 15

Full Committee: June 6

Floor: July 19

Subcommittee: June 12

Full Committee: June 14

Floor: August 1

 
Labor HHS Education Subcommittee: June 15

Full Committee: July 11

Subcommittee: June 26

Full Committee: June 28

Floor: August 23

House Floor: Sept. 26

Senate Floor: Sept. 18

Signed Into Law: Sept. 28

Legislative Branch Subcommittee: April 26

Full Committee: May 8

Floor: June 8

Full Committee: June 14

Floor: June 25

House Floor: Sept. 12

Senate Floor: Sept. 13

Signed Into Law: Sept. 21

Military Construction VA Subcommittee: April 26

Full Committee: May 8

Floor: June 8

Subcommittee: June 5

Full Committee: June 7

Floor: June 25

House Floor: Sept. 12

Senate Floor: Sept. 13

Signed Into Law: Sept. 21

State Foreign Operations Subcommittee: June 13

Full Committee: June 20

Subcommittee: June 19

Full Committee: Jun 21

 
Transportation HUD Subcommittee: May 16

Full Committee: May 23

Subcommittee: June 5

Full Committee: June 7

Floor: August 1

 

President Signs First FY2019 Appropriations Minibus Spending Package

The President signed into law the first minibus spending package, H.R. 5895, today while visiting the North Las Vegas Medical Center. The minibus sets funding levels for FY19 for the Energy & Water, Military Construction-Veterans Affairs, and Legislative Branch spending bills.

Defense, Labor HHS Education

The Senate adopted a conference report for the FY19 Defense and Labor HHS Education spending bills by a vote of 93 to 7. Senators voting against the measure were: Flake (R-AZ), Lee (R-UT), Paul (R-KY), Perdue (R-GA), Sanders (I-VT), Sasse (R-NE), and Toomey (R-PA). While some GOP conservatives have threatened to oppose the bill because of the non-defense spending levels, House leadership is confident the measure will pass with broad bipartisan support.

The $855.1B package also includes a continuing resolution extending current funding levels through December 7 for any federal agencies that don’t get their FY19 appropriations bills passed by October 1 as well as a short-term extension of the Violence Against Women Act and sections of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act.

Conference Report Text

https://docs.house.gov/billsthisweek/20180910/CRPT-115hrpt952.pdf

Joint Explanatory Statement

https://docs.house.gov/billsthisweek/20180910/Joint%20%20Statement.pdf

Interior-Environment, Financial Services, Agriculture, Transportation HUD

House and Senate negotiators continue to work on a deal on the $154 billion spending package covering the Interior-Environment, Financial Services, Agriculture, and Transportation-HUD spending bills. When conferees met last week, there were disagreements over policy riders affecting environmental regulations. Two other issues holding up a conference agreement are a $585M “Fund for America’s Kids and Grandkids” and the federal employee pay raise.

FY2019 Appropriations Bills Status

Subcommittee House Action Senate Action Conference
Agriculture Subcommittee: May 9

Full Committee: May 16

Subcommittee: May 22

Full Committee: May 24

Floor: August 1

 
Commerce Justice Science Subcommittee: May 9

Full Committee: May 17

Subcommittee: June 12

Full Committee: June 14

 
Defense Subcommittee: June 7

Full Committee: June 13

Floor: June 28

Subcommittee: June 26

Full Committee: June 28

Floor: August 23

House Floor:

Senate Floor: Sept. 18

Signed Into Law:

Energy & Water Subcommittee: May 7

Full Committee: May 16

Floor: June 8

Subcommittee: May 22

Full Committee: May 24

Floor: June 25

House Floor: Sept. 12

Senate Floor: Sept. 13

Signed Into Law: Sept. 21

Financial Services Subcommittee: May 24

Full Committee: June 13

Floor: July 19

Subcommittee: June 19

Full Committee: Jun 21

Floor: August 1

 
Homeland Security Subcommittee: July 19

Full Committee: July 25

Subcommittee: June 19

Full Committee: Jun 21

 
Interior Environment Subcommittee: May 15

Full Committee: June 6

Floor: July 19

Subcommittee: June 12

Full Committee: June 14

Floor: August 1

 
Labor HHS Education Subcommittee: June 15

Full Committee: July 11

Subcommittee: June 26

Full Committee: June 28

Floor: August 23

House Floor:

Senate Floor: Sept. 18

Signed Into Law:

Legislative Branch Subcommittee: April 26

Full Committee: May 8

Floor: June 8

Full Committee: June 14

Floor: June 25

House Floor: Sept. 12

Senate Floor: Sept. 13

Signed Into Law: Sept. 21

Military Construction VA Subcommittee: April 26

Full Committee: May 8

Floor: June 8

Subcommittee: June 5

Full Committee: June 7

Floor: June 25

House Floor: Sept. 12

Senate Floor: Sept. 13

Signed Into Law: Sept. 21

State Foreign Operations Subcommittee: June 13

Full Committee: June 20

Subcommittee: June 19

Full Committee: Jun 21

 
Transportation HUD Subcommittee: May 16

Full Committee: May 23

Subcommittee: June 5

Full Committee: June 7

Floor: August 1

 

FY19 Appropriations Update

Energy & Water, Military Construction-Veterans Affairs, Legislative Branch

The House and Senate passed the $147.5B FY19 Energy & Water, Military Construction-Veterans Affairs, Legislative Branch appropriations minibus conference agreement this week and sent the measure to the President for his signature.

The Senate passed the bill on Wednesday by a vote of 92 to 5. The five no votes were from Flake (R-AZ), Gillibrand (D-NY), Markey (D-MA), Paul (R-KY), and Warren (D-MA). The House followed and passed it on Thursday by a vote of 377 to 20 (two Democrats and 18 Republicans voted no). This is the first time in 10 years that Congress managed to pass three spending bills on time.

The spending package provided $98.1B for the Military Construction-Veterans Affairs bill (a 5.8% increase over FY18), $44.6B for the Energy & Water bill (a 3.2% increase over FY18), and $4.8B for the Legislative Branch bill (a 2.1% increase over FY18). It also included an additional $1.25B to cover an immediate funding shortfall for the Veterans Choice Program. The bill did not include any partisan policy riders that had been included in the House versions of the bills.

Conference Report

https://www.appropriations.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/Conference%20Report%20to%20accompany%20H.R.%205895.pdf

Joint Explanatory Statement

https://www.appropriations.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/Joint%20Explanatory%20Statement%20H.R.%205895.pdf

Defense, Labor HHS Education

House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise on the two biggest annual spending bills, paving the way for final adoption of the Defense and Labor HHS Education appropriations bills in time for the new fiscal year that begins on Oct. 1.

The $855B conference agreement also includes a continuing resolution (CR) that would fund the federal agencies that don’t get their full-year appropriations bills completed on time. The CR would extend current fiscal year funding levels for those agencies through December 7. Conferees hope to avoid a partial federal government shutdown by including the CR in the Defense minibus. The President would have to veto defense spending if he wanted to shutdown he federal government over border wall funding.

Like the Energy & Water, Military Construction-VA, Legislative Branch minibus conference agreement, this package does not include any of the partisan policy riders sought by House Republicans. While House conservatives have threatened to withhold their support for the bill on the floor, House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-WI) is confident that the measure has enough bipartisan support for passage.

The Senate may take up the conference agreement next week. The House would then consider the measure when they return from recess the week of September 24.

Conference Report Text

https://docs.house.gov/billsthisweek/20180910/CRPT-115hrpt952.pdf 

Joint Explanatory Statement

https://docs.house.gov/billsthisweek/20180910/Joint%20%20Statement.pdf

Interior-Environment, Financial Services, Agriculture, Transportation HUD

House and Senate negotiators met this week to conference the final minibus spending package that they hope to pass before the end of this fiscal year. The $154B four-bill package includes the Interior-Environment, Financial Services, Agriculture, and Transportation HUD spending bills. While they had hoped to finalize an agreement this week, negotiators could not reach agreement on several partisan policy riders. Many of these riders are in the Interior-Environment portion of the minibus. Republicans agreed to forgo their riders in the other two minibus spending packages, but had yet to do so in this minibus. Negotiators are still hopeful that they will be able to reach a deal in the coming days.

FY2019 Appropriations Bills Status

Subcommittee House Action Senate Action Conference
Agriculture Subcommittee: May 9

Full Committee: May 16

Subcommittee: May 22

Full Committee: May 24

Floor: August 1

 
Commerce Justice Science Subcommittee: May 9

Full Committee: May 17

Subcommittee: June 12

Full Committee: June 14

 
Defense Subcommittee: June 7

Full Committee: June 13

Floor: June 28

Subcommittee: June 26

Full Committee: June 28

Floor: August 23

 
Energy & Water Subcommittee: May 7

Full Committee: May 16

Floor: June 8

Subcommittee: May 22

Full Committee: May 24

Floor: June 25

House Floor: Sept. 12

Senate Floor: Sept. 13

Signed Into Law:

Financial Services Subcommittee: May 24

Full Committee: June 13

Floor: July 19

Subcommittee: June 19

Full Committee: Jun 21

Floor: August 1

 
Homeland Security Subcommittee: July 19

Full Committee: July 25

Subcommittee: June 19

Full Committee: Jun 21

 
Interior Environment Subcommittee: May 15

Full Committee: June 6

Floor: July 19

Subcommittee: June 12

Full Committee: June 14

Floor: August 1

 
Labor HHS Education Subcommittee: June 15

Full Committee: July 11

Subcommittee: June 26

Full Committee: June 28

Floor: August 23

 
Legislative Branch Subcommittee: April 26

Full Committee: May 8

Floor: June 8

Full Committee: June 14

Floor: June 25

House Floor: Sept. 12

Senate Floor: Sept. 13

Signed Into Law:

Military Construction VA Subcommittee: April 26

Full Committee: May 8

Floor: June 8

Subcommittee: June 5

Full Committee: June 7

Floor: June 25

House Floor: Sept. 12

Senate Floor: Sept. 13

Signed Into Law:

State Foreign Operations Subcommittee: June 13

Full Committee: June 20

Subcommittee: June 19

Full Committee: Jun 21

 
Transportation HUD Subcommittee: May 16

Full Committee: May 23

Subcommittee: June 5

Full Committee: June 7

Floor: August 1