Cybersecurity Presidential Policy Directive (PPD-41)

The President signed a Presidential Policy Directive (PPD) this week that sets forth principles for the Federal Government’s response to any cyber incident, whether it involves other governments or private sector entities. The principles are shared responsibility, risk-based response, respecting affected entities, unity of effort, and enabling restoration and recovery. For significant cyber incidents, the PPD establishes lead federal agencies and an architecture for coordinating a broader Federal Government response to the incident.

PPD-41 also delineates government agency roles during cyber incidents. The Department of Justice (DOJ), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), and other related agencies make up the Cyber Unified Coordination Group, which will be the main go-between for responding to major cyber events. DOJ (through the FBI and the National Cyber Investigative Joint Task Force) will lead on threat response, DHS is charged with asset response, and ODNI will take the lead on the analysis and intelligence aspect of the response. For threat response, DOJ will communicate with stakeholders at an affected organization and with law enforcement to collect evidence and intelligence, stop the immediate cyber threat, and start the information sharing process with DHS. Asset response involves helping the victim find the bad actor on its system, repair the system, patch the vulnerability, reduce the risks of future incidents, and prevent the incident from happening to others.

The PPD also directs DHS to lead the effort to write the National Cyber Incident Response Plan. This Plan will set out how the federal government will work with the private sector and state, local, and territorial governments in responding to a significant cyber incident.

Presidential Policy Directive — United States Cyber Incident Coordination:

https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/07/26/presidential-policy-directive-united-states-cyber-incident

Annex for Presidential Policy Directive — United States Cyber Incident Coordination:

https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/07/26/annex-presidential-policy-directive-united-states-cyber-incident

FACT SHEET: Presidential Policy Directive on United States Cyber Incident Coordination:

https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/07/26/fact-sheet-presidential-policy-directive-united-states-cyber-incident-1

Statement by DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson:

https://www.dhs.gov/news/2016/07/26/statement-secretary-jeh-c-johnson-regarding-ppd-41-cyber-incident-coordination

Defense Innovation Unit Experimental (DIUx) 2.0 Opened in Boston

Department of Defense (DOD) Secretary Ash Carter formally opened a Defense Innovation Unit Experimental office in Boston this week, dubbed DIUx 2.0. Secretary Carter said that they chose Boston because it is an area demonstrating great innovation in biotechnology and the biosciences. Bernadette Johnson, Chief Technology Officer at Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Lincoln Labs, was appointed as DIUx’s Chief Science Officer, and Air Force Reserve Colonel Mike McGinley is becoming active duty to be the military lead in Boston.

Secretary Carter also announced nine new appointees to the Defense Innovation Advisory Board (DIAB). Previously he had announced that the board would be led by Chairman Eric Schmidt, Executive Chairman of Alphabet Inc, and would also include LinkedIn Executive Chairman Reid Hoffman, U.S. Special Operations commander Bill McRaven, and the Aspen Institute’s Walter Isaacson. The board has been tasked with identifying innovative private sector best practices that could be of use to DOD. These best practices could be organizational, technological, operational, or how people and talent are managed. The board’s recommendations are due this fall. The current and prospective Board members are:

  • Eric Schmidt, executive chairman, Alphabet Inc. (DIAB chair)
  • Jeff Bezos, president, chairman and CEO, Amazon Inc.
  • Adam Grant, professor, Wharton School of Business
  • Danny Hillis, computer theorist & co-founder, Applied Inventions
  • Reid Hoffman, co-founder, LinkedIn, and partner, Greylock Partners
  • Walter Isaacson, president & CEO, Aspen Institute
  • Eric Lander, president and founding director, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
  • Marne Levine, chief operating officer, Instagram
  • Michael McQuade, senior vice president for science and technology, United Technologies
  • William McRaven, chancellor, University of Texas System
  • Milo Medin, vice president, Access Services, Google Capital
  • Richard Murray, professor, California Institute of Technology
  • Jennifer Pahlka, founder, Code for America
  • Cass Sunstein, professor, Harvard Law School
  • Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist and author

The program was originally launched last year with an office in Silicon Valley. It was created as a way for DOD to more easily partner with tech industries. The effort was rebooted in May of this year when Secretary Carter changed its leadership, had it report directly to him, and appointed a Defense Innovation Advisory Board.

The program now also has its own contracting capability and budget resources. DIUx is employing an innovation engagement mechanism called a Commercial Solutions Opening (CSO) to take advantage of flexible new authorities for prototyping granted by Congress. The CSO allows tech firms to bring ideas to DOD in the same way they would to other buyers of commercial technology, streamlining paperwork requirements and allowing the department to provide funding in less than 60 days after first contact with a firm and within 30 days after receiving a formal proposal.

The Secretary also said that DIUx is now divided into three teams: Engagement, Foundry, and Venture. The Engagement Team acts as a liaison between the military and business owners, introducing private industry innovators to the problems faced by the military. The Foundry team develops existing technologies until they can be put into use by the military. DIUX’s Warfighter-in-Residence and Entrepreneur-in-Residence programs match soldiers with industry engineers to rapidly design, prototype, and test new equipment and systems. And the Venture team seeks out new commercial technologies and attempts to adapt them to defense applications. They make research and development awards to companies ranging from start-ups to major tech companies. They also seek to match these projects with DOD customers for funding and staffing resources.

All of these new announcements are part of Secretary Carter’s efforts to ensure that the initiative lasts beyond his tenure at the helm of DOD.

FY16 Budget and FY17 Appropriations Update – July 15, 2016

FY16 Budget Mid-Session Review

The Office of Management and Budget OMB released its mid-session review today, which projects the 2016 deficit to be $600B. This is $16B lower than OMB’s February projection. As a percentage of gross domestic product (GDP), the projected deficit remains at 3%, same as the February projection.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/budget/fy2017/assets/17msr.pdf

FY17 Appropriations

The House and Senate Appropriations Committees have marked up and reported out of committee all of their FY17 appropriations bills, but with the Congress now in recess for the next 7 ½ weeks and the House and Senate scheduled to only be in session 17 and 19 (respectively) days before the end of the fiscal year talk has now turned to a continuing resolution (CR).

The House Republican Conference was scheduled to hold a planning meeting on Thursday to address issues for the fall term including the length of a CR, but the meeting was cancelled. Conservative House Republicans are pushing for a stopgap spending measure that would fund the government through March 2017 allowing a new Congress and President to complete the budget process. They are concerned that Republican leaders would use the lame-duck session to cut deals on major legislation. In previous presidential election years (2008 and 2012), Congress pushed funding bills into March. March is also when the current suspension of the debt limit is set to expire.

Senate appropriators, on the other hand, prefer a CR funding the government into December allowing them enough time to complete work on separate FY17 spending bills or an omnibus package. They are concerned that making federal agencies operate under a CR for six months keeps them stuck on “autopilot” and could lead to a year-long CR. A CR would likely extend current funding without allowing any money for new programs.

House

Floor

The House passed its fifth FY17 spending bill this week. The $32.095B FY17 Interior appropriations bill passed by a vote of 231 to 196 (3 Democrats voted for the measure and 15 Republicans voted against it). This is the first time since 2009 that this annual spending bill has been passed by the House. The President has threatened to veto the bill over the funding level as well as policy riders that the administration believes would undermine environmental protection.

House FY17 Interior Appropriations Bill Text:

https://www.congress.gov/114/bills/hr5538/BILLS-114hr5538rh.pdf

House FY17 Interior Appropriations Report Language:

https://www.congress.gov/114/crpt/hrpt632/CRPT-114hrpt632.pdf

OMB Statement of Administration Policy on House FY17 Interior Bill:

https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/legislative/sap/114/saphr5538r_20160711.pdf

Labor HHS Education

The House Appropriations Committee marked up its $161.6B Labor HHS Education spending bill in full committee this week after debating the bill for two days. The bill is $569M below the FY16 enacted level, $2.8B below the President’s FY17 budget request, and approximately $300M less than the Senate FY17 version. The bill was approved by a vote of 31 to 19. It is the 12th and final bill to be considered by the House appropriations committee this year.

The following amendments were adopted during full committee consideration of the bill:

  • Cole – The amendment makes technical and non-controversial changes to the bill and report. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.
  • Kaptur – The amendment adds report language directing the CDC to coordinate with other agencies and States on the public health effects of algal-blooms. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.
  • Ryan – The amendment adds report language directing the Bureau of Labor Statistics to conduct a study on the impacts of free trade agreements on the U.S. labor market. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.
  • Harris – The amendment specifies that any federal funding provided in any act of law may only be used to provide In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) treatments if such treatments do not result in the destruction of viable human embryos before embryo transfer. The amendment was adopted on a vote of 29-21.
  • Lee – The amendment adds report language requesting a Department of Education study on the adverse impacts of school segregation. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Committee members rebuffed Democratic amendments related to family planning, the Zika outbreak, and gun violence. The bill does create for the first time an emergency reserve fund to combat any outbreak of an infectious disease. The bill includes $300M for the fund, but Democrats argue that more funding is needed.

House FY17 Labor HHS Education Bill Text:

http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/bills-114hr-fc-ap-fy2017-ap00-laborhhsed.pdf

House FY17 Labor HHS Education Report Language:

http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/hrpt-114-hr-fy2017-laborhhsed.pdf

House FY17 Labor HHS Education Summary:

http://appropriations.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=394633

State Foreign Operations

The House Appropriations Committee marked up its $52B FY17 State Foreign Operations spending bill this week. The bill is $595M below the FY16 enacted level, $691M below the President’s FY17 budget request, and roughly $100M below the Senate’s FY17 funding level. Within the overall funding amount, Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) funding totals $14.9B, which is equal to the FY16 enacted level. The bill was reported out of full committee by voice vote and in addition to a manager’s amendment, the only other amendment adopted was one to modify the quorum requirement for the Export-Import Bank Board through September 30, 2019. This is needed for the Bank to approve certain transactions as three of the five Board positions are currently vacant.

House FY17 State Foreign Operations Bill Text:

http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/bills-114hr-fc-ap-fy2017-ap00-stateforop.pdf

House FY17 State Foreign Operations Report Language:

http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/hrpt-114-hr-fy2017-stateforop.pdf

House FY17 State Foreign Operations Summary:

http://appropriations.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=394623

Senate

Floor

The Senate voted for the second time this month on a cloture vote on the FY17 Defense Appropriations bill. The vote again failed by a vote of 55 to 42 (60 votes are required under Senate rules). Democrats are objecting to the bill saying that Republicans are not abiding by last year’s bipartisan budget deal, and that they are funding defense at the expense of other non-defense discretionary spending measures.

FY17 Military Construction-Veterans Affairs and Zika Virus Funding Conference Agreement

Once again, Senate Democrats rejected an attempt by Senate Republicans to move forward on the conference agreement to the FY17 Military Construction-Veterans Affairs/Zika Virus appropriations bill. With more than 4,200 people in the U.S. and its territories already infected with the virus (including 649 pregnant women), federal health officials are concerned about the spread of the disease during the summer months.

Republican House and Senate Appropriators sent a letter to President Obama yesterday urging the White House to take action on Zika funding. They wrote that the White House should “aggressively use funds already available to mount a strong defense against the virus” if Senate Democrats continue to block the consideration of Zika legislation. They also questioned why the administration hasn’t already used the $500M that is already available for the Zika virus.

Letter to President Obama:

http://appropriations.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=394655

Subcommittee                     House                                      Senate

Agriculture Subcommittee: April 13

Full Committee: April 19

Subcommittee: May 17

Full Committee: May 19

Commerce-Justice-Science Subcommittee: May 18

Full Committee: May 24

Subcommittee: April 19

Full Committee: April 21

Floor: Week of June 27

Defense Subcommittee: May 11

Full Committee: May 17

Floor: Passed June 16

Subcommittee: May 24

Full Committee: May 26

Floor: Failed Cloture Vote 7/14

Energy & Water Subcommittee: April 13

Full Committee: April 19

Floor: Pulled after voted down 5/26

Subcommittee: April 13

Full Committee: April 14

Floor: Passed May 12

Financial Services Subcommittee: May 25

Full Committee: June 9

Floor: Passed July 7

Subcommittee: June 15

Full Committee: June 16

Homeland Security Subcommittee: June 9

Full Committee: June 22

Subcommittee: May 24

Full Committee: May 26

Interior Subcommittee: May 25

Full Committee: June 15

Floor: Passed July 14

Subcommittee: June 14

Full Committee: June 16

Labor HHS Education Subcommittee: July 7

Full Committee: July 14

Subcommittee: June 7

Full Committee: June 9

Legislative Branch Subcommittee: April 20

Full Committee: May 17

Floor: Passed June 10

Full Committee: May 19
Military Construction – Veterans Affairs Subcommittee: March 22

Full Committee: April 13

Floor: Passed May 19

Conference: Passed June 23

Subcommittee: April 13

Full Committee: April 14

Floor: Passed May 19

Conference: Failed Cloture Vote 7/14

State Foreign Operations Subcommittee: July 6

Full Committee: July 12

Subcommittee: June 28

Full Committee: June 29

Transportation HUD Subcommittee: May 18

Full Committee: May 24

Subcommittee: April 19

Full Committee: April 21

Floor: Passed May 19

 

FY16 vs. FY17 302(b) Allocations

  FY16 302(b) FY17 House 302(b) FY17 Senate 302(b)
Agriculture $21.75B $21.3B $21.2B
Commerce Justice Science $55.7B $56B $56.3B
Defense* $572.7B $575.7B $572.7B
Energy & Water $37.2B $37.4B $37.5B
Financial Services $23.2B $21.7B $22.4B
Homeland Security* $41.12B $41.1B $41.2B
Interior $32.16B $32.095B $32.03B
Labor HHS Education $162.1B $161.6B $161.9B
Legislative Branch $4.37B $3.48B

(excludes Senate only items)

$4.4B
Military Construction/VA* $79.9B $81.6B $83B
State Foreign Ops* $52.68B $52.0B $52.1B
Transportation HUD $57.6B $58.2B $56.5B

*Includes Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) funding.

FY17 Appropriations Update – July 8, 2016

With Congress about to go into recess at the end of next week until September and the Senate’s rejection of the cloture vote on their FY17 Defense spending bill, appropriators are once again talking about a year-end omnibus spending package as well as a continuing resolution (CR). There is already internal debate among lawmakers over how long a CR should last to keep the government running in the meantime. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) has said that he would like to return to the appropriations process when they reconvene in September. Over on the House side, Conservatives in the Freedom Caucus are seeking a vote on a six-month CR next week, but House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) said this week that they can still work on appropriations bills and that he doesn’t “think that’s the right time to do a CR.” Other senior appropriators like Rep. Tom Cole (R-OK) agreed with McCarthy and are pushing for a CR that would end by December allowing Congress to pass an omnibus in the lame-duck session.

House

Floor

The House passed its $21.7B FY17 Financial Services Appropriations bill this week by a vote of 239 to 185 (four Democrats voted for the measure and 7 Republicans voted against it). The President has threatened to veto the bill over spending cuts and policy riders. During consideration of the bill, the House adopted an amendment by a vote of 217 to 203 that would bar funding to change registration requirements for the Selective Service System. The amendment, in effect, prevents women from being able to register for a potential military draft, which was a provision included in the Senate’s FY17 National Defense Authorization Act.

House FY17 Financial Services Bill Text:

https://www.congress.gov/114/bills/hr5485/BILLS-114hr5485rh.pdf

House FY17 Financial Services Report Language:

https://www.congress.gov/114/crpt/hrpt624/CRPT-114hrpt624.pdf

Statement of Administration Policy:

https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/legislative/sap/114/saphr5485r_20160621.pdf

Next week the House will take up its $32.095B FY17 Interior appropriations bill on the House floor. The House Rules Committee will meet on Monday to determine which amendments will be considered.

House FY17 Interior Appropriations Bill Text:

https://www.congress.gov/114/bills/hr5538/BILLS-114hr5538rh.pdf

House FY17 Interior Appropriations Report Language:

https://www.congress.gov/114/crpt/hrpt632/CRPT-114hrpt632.pdf

Amendments Offered to House FY17 Interior Appropriations Bill:

https://rules.house.gov/bill/114/hr-5538

Labor HHS Education

The House Labor HHS Education Appropriations subcommittee marked up its $161.6B spending bill in subcommittee this week. The bill is $569M below the FY16 enacted level, $2.8B below the President’s FY17 budget request, and approximately $300M less than the Senate FY17 version. The bill was approved by voice vote and will be marked up in full committee next Wednesday. It is the 12th and final bill to be considered by the House appropriations committee this year.

House FY17 Labor HHS Bill Text:

http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/bills-114hr-sc-ap-fy2017-laborhhs-subcommitteedraft.pdf

House FY17 Labor HHS Summary:

http://appropriations.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=394633

State Foreign Operations

The House State Foreign Operations Appropriations subcommittee marked up its $52B FY17 spending bill this week. The bill is $595M below the FY16 enacted level, $691M below the President’s FY17 budget request, and roughly $100M below the Senate’s FY17 funding level. Within the overall funding amount, Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) funding totals $14.9B, which is equal to the FY16 enacted level. The bill was reported out of subcommittee unanimously despite the inclusion of policy riders related to abortion and climate change. The bill will be marked up in full committee next Tuesday.

House FY17 State Foreign Operations Bill Text:

http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfiles/bills-114hr-sc-ap-fy2017-stateforop-subcommitteedraft.pdf

House FY17 State Foreign Operations Summary:

http://appropriations.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=394623

Senate

Floor

Democrats in the Senate blocked consideration of the FY17 Defense Appropriations bill in a cloture vote on the motion to proceed. The vote failed 50 to 44 with two Democrats (Donnelly and Manchin) voting for cloture. Sixty votes were needed to proceed. The bill had passed out of committee unanimously (30-0) on May 26. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) said that the Senate would resume consideration of the motion to proceed to the spending bill next week.

FY17 Military Construction-Veterans Affairs and Zika Virus Funding Conference Agreement

With only one week left before the summer recess, Congress has not completed action on the FY17 Military Construction-Veterans Affairs (MilConVA) conference spending bill that includes emergency funding for the Zika virus. While the administration had requested $1.9B for Zika, Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) indicated this week that they would accept the $1.1B that the Senate had approved on a bipartisan basis last month. However, the administration still objects to the inclusion of restrictions on funding for Planned Parenthood and the funding offsets as well as the fact that the bill doesn’t represent a bipartisan compromise. Democrats also object to provisions in the MilConVA portion of the bill including the removal of environmental safeguards on pesticide spraying, reduced funding for veterans, and the removal of a provision prohibiting the flying of the Confederate flag at veterans cemeteries. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) has promised another vote on the measure before the end of next week.

Subcommittee                     House                                      Senate

Agriculture Subcommittee: April 13

Full Committee: April 19

Subcommittee: May 17

Full Committee: May 19

Commerce-Justice-Science Subcommittee: May 18

Full Committee: May 24

Subcommittee: April 19

Full Committee: April 21

Floor: Week of June 27

Defense Subcommittee: May 11

Full Committee: May 17

Floor: Passed June 16

Subcommittee: May 24

Full Committee: May 26

Floor: Week of July 11

Energy & Water Subcommittee: April 13

Full Committee: April 19

Floor: Pulled after voted down

Subcommittee: April 13

Full Committee: April 14

Floor: Passed May 12

Financial Services Subcommittee: May 25

Full Committee: June 9

Floor: Pulled after Democrat sit-in for gun control

Subcommittee: June 15

Full Committee: June 16

Homeland Security Subcommittee: June 9

Full Committee: June 22

Subcommittee: May 24

Full Committee: May 26

Interior Subcommittee: May 25

Full Committee: June 15

Floor: Week of July 11

Subcommittee: June 14

Full Committee: June 16

Labor HHS Education Subcommittee: July 7

Full Committee: July 13

Subcommittee: June 7

Full Committee: June 9

Legislative Branch Subcommittee: April 20

Full Committee: May 17

Floor: Passed June 10

Full Committee: May 19
Military Construction – Veterans Affairs Subcommittee: March 22

Full Committee: April 13

Floor: Passed May 19

Conference: June 23

Subcommittee: April 13

Full Committee: April 14

Floor: Passed May 19

Conference: Week of June 27

State Foreign Operations Subcommittee: July 6

Full Committee: July 12

Subcommittee: June 28

Full Committee: June 29

Transportation HUD Subcommittee: May 18

Full Committee: May 24

Subcommittee: April 19

Full Committee: April 21

Floor: Passed May 19

FY16 vs. FY17 302(b) Allocations

  FY16 302(b) FY17 House 302(b) FY17 Senate 302(b)
Agriculture $21.75B $21.3B $21.2B
Commerce Justice Science $55.7B $56B $56.3B
Defense* $572.7B $575.7B $572.7B
Energy & Water $37.2B $37.4B $37.5B
Financial Services $23.2B $21.7B $22.4B
Homeland Security* $41.12B $41.1B $41.2B
Interior $32.16B $32.095B $32.03B
Labor HHS Education $162.1B $161.6B $161.9B
Legislative Branch $4.37B $3.48B

(excludes Senate only items)

$4.4B
Military Construction/VA* $79.9B $81.6B $83B
State Foreign Ops* $52.68B $52.0B $52.1B
Transportation HUD $57.6B $58.2B $56.5B

*Includes Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) funding.

FY17 Appropriations Update – July 1, 2016

Senate

The Senate Appropriations Committee completed work on all of its 12 annual spending bills this week when it marked up its $52.08B FY17 State Foreign Operations appropriations bill in subcommittee and full committee. The bill was approved on a 30 to 0 vote. It is $591M below the FY16 enacted level and $687.4M below the President’s FY17 budget request. Of the $52.08B amount, $37.19B is for enduring costs and $14.89 billion is for Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO). This is the earliest the committee has finished its work since 1988.

Senate FY17 State Foreign Operations Bill Text:

http://www.vantagepointstrat.com/senate-fy17-state-foreign-ops-bill-text-6-29-16/

Senate FY17 State Foreign Operations Report Language:

http://www.vantagepointstrat.com/senate-fy17-state-foreign-ops-report-language-6-29-16/

Majority Bill Summary:

http://www.appropriations.senate.gov/news/majority/fy2017-state-and-foreign-operations-appropriations-bill-gains-subcommittee-approval

Minority Bill Summary:

http://www.appropriations.senate.gov/news/minority/fy17-state-and-foreign-operations-subcommittee-markup-bill-summary

FY17 Military Construction-Veterans Affairs and Zika Virus Funding Conference Agreement

The Senate failed to invoke cloture on the FY17 Military Construction-Veterans Affairs and Zika virus funding conference agreement. The vote was 52 to 48 with two Republicans voting against clotures (Mike Lee of Utah and James Lankford of Oklahoma) and one Democrat (Joe Donnelly of Indiana) voting for it. After the vote failed, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) vowed to bring the measure back to the floor after the July 4th recess, but Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn (R-TX) said that he did not expect Republicans to reopen negotiations with Democrats on Zika funding.

Middle East Emergency Funding Package

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) indicated this week that he has held preliminary discussions with Senate Appropriations Ranking Member Barbara Mikulski (D-MD) regarding $4B emergency funding package aimed at helping Middle East allies (e.g. Lebanon and Jordan) cope with the Syrian refugee crisis.

Subcommittee House Senate
Agriculture Subcommittee: April 13

Full Committee: April 19

Subcommittee: May 17

Full Committee: May 19

Commerce-Justice-Science Subcommittee: May 18

Full Committee: May 24

Subcommittee: April 19

Full Committee: April 21

Floor: Week of June 27

Defense Subcommittee: May 11

Full Committee: May 17

Floor: June 16

Subcommittee: May 24

Full Committee: May 26

Energy & Water Subcommittee: April 13

Full Committee: April 19

Floor: Pulled after voted down

Subcommittee: April 13

Full Committee: April 14

Floor: May 12

Financial Services Subcommittee: May 25

Full Committee: June 9

Floor: Pulled after Democrat sit-in for gun control

Subcommittee: June 15

Full Committee: June 16

Homeland Security Subcommittee: June 9

Full Committee: June 22

Subcommittee: May 24

Full Committee: May 26

Interior Subcommittee: May 25

Full Committee: June 15

Subcommittee: June 14

Full Committee: June 16

Labor HHS Education   Subcommittee: June 7

Full Committee: June 9

Legislative Branch Subcommittee: April 20

Full Committee: May 17

Floor: June 10

Full Committee: May 19
Military Construction – Veterans Affairs Subcommittee: March 22

Full Committee: April 13

Floor: May 19

Conference: June 23

Subcommittee: April 13

Full Committee: April 14

Floor: May 19

Conference: Week of June 27

State Foreign Operations Subcommittee: July 6 Subcommittee: June 28

Full Committee: June 29

Transportation HUD Subcommittee: May 18

Full Committee: May 24

Subcommittee: April 19

Full Committee: April 21

Floor: May 19

 

FY16 vs. FY17 302(b) Allocations

  FY16 302(b) FY17 House 302(b) FY17 Senate 302(b)
Agriculture $21.75B $21.3B $21.2B
Commerce Justice Science $55.7B $56B $56.3B
Defense* $572.7B $575.7B $572.7B
Energy & Water $37.2B $37.4B $37.5B
Financial Services $23.2B $21.7B $22.4B
Homeland Security* $41.12B $41.1B $41.2B
Interior $32.16B $32.095B $32.03B
Labor HHS Education $162.1B   $161.9B
Legislative Branch $4.37B $3.48B

(excludes Senate only items)

$4.4B
Military Construction/VA* $79.9B $81.6B $83B
State Foreign Ops* $52.68B $52.0B $52.1B
Transportation HUD $57.6B $58.2B $56.5B

*Includes Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) funding.