House to Begin Marking Up FY20 Spending Bills Next Week

The House Appropriations Committee will kick off its markups of FY20 spending bills next week with the Labor-HHS-Education and Legislative Branch measures all going before their respective subcommittees. The Labor-HHS-Education bill will be marked up in subcommittee April 30, and in full committee on May 8. The Military Construction-VA and Legislative Branch bills will be marked up in their respective subcommittees on May 1. The committee is expected to approve suballocations, known as 302(b)s, for the 12 spending bills at that May 8 full committee markup.

The Appropriations Committee also is looking at marking up the Defense bill soon, though no date has been set. Energy-Water also could be one of the first several bills to be marked up.

House Appropriations Chairwoman Nita Lowey (D-NY) is writing the bills to the $664B defense limit and $631B nondefense limit as the House adopted on April 9 an informal “deeming” resolution (H.Res. 293) that sets an overall discretionary topline of $1.295 trillion.

FY2020 Appropriations Bills Status

SubcommitteeHouse ActionSenate Action
Agriculture  
Commerce Justice Science  
Defense  
Energy & Water  
Financial Services  
Homeland Security  
Interior Environment  
Labor HHS EducationSubcommittee: April 30  
Legislative BranchSubcommittee: May 1  
Military Construction VASubcommittee: May 1  
State Foreign Operations  
Transportation HUD  

House Budget Committee Passes Bill Raising FY20 Budget Caps

Earlier this week House Democrats on the Budget Committee released the text of their draft bill to raise the discretionary spending caps for FY20 and FY21 by $356B. The bill sets the FY20 defense spending cap at $733B and the non-defense spending at $639B for FY20. 

The House Budget Committee met on Wednesday and approved the bill by a vote of 19-17. All of the votes in favor of passage were from Democrats while three Democrats joined all 14 Republicans in voting against the measure. Reps. Ro Khanna (D-CA), Ilhan Omar (D-MN), and Pramila Jayapal (D-WA) all voted against the bill because it raises defense spending caps. The bill could be on the House floor next week, but it will have a tough time getting passed, and it isn’t likely to be considered by the Republican-controlled Senate. But it serves as a starting point for negotiations on raising the spending caps for FY20 and FY21.

 FY19 EnactedFY20 (Cap)FY20 President’s Budget RequestFY20 House Budget CommitteeFY21 (Cap)FY21 House Budget Committee
Defense$647.0B$576.2B$576.0B$664.0B$590.1B$680.119B
OCO & Emergency Defense$69.0B $174.0B$69.0B $69.0B
Total Defense$716.0B$576.2B$750.0B$733.0B$590.1B$749.119B
       
Non-Defense$597.0B$542.1B$543.0B$631.018B$554.6B$646.056B
OCO Non-Defense$8.0B  $8.0B $8.0B
Disaster Relief$12.0B $19.0B   
Program Integrity Init.$1.897B $2.0B   
Emergency Require.$1.68B     
Wildfire Suppression  $2.0B   
Total Non-Defense$620.577B$542.1B$567.0B$639.018B$554.6B$654.056B

Attorney General Sends Congressional Leaders Letter Summarizing Special Counsel Mueller’s Report

U.S. Attorney General William Barr sent a letter to Congressional leaders on Sunday summarizing Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s findings. While the President described it as “total exoneration,” the AG’s summary is a little more complicated.

On May 17, 2017, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein appointed former FBI Director Robert Mueller as Special Counsel to conduct the investigation of any links and/or coordination between the Russian government and individuals associated with the Trump campaign, any matters that arose or may arise directly from the investigation, and any federal crimes committed in the course of, and with intent to interfere with, the Special Counsel’s investigation, such as perjury, obstruction of justice, destruction of evidence, and intimidation of witnesses. (Special Counsel Order:https://www.justice.gov/opa/press-release/file/967231/download

During the investigation, Special Counsel Mueller indicted 34 people and three entities on 200 separate criminal charges. In February 2018, 13 Russian nationals and three Russian entities were charged with conspiring to defraud the United States and interfere with the 2016 presidential election. One of the entities was the Internet Research Agency, a Kremlin-linked company that engages in influence operations. In July 2018, Special Counsel Mueller indicted an additional 12 Russian intelligence officers for their role in the hacking of the Democratic National Committee, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, and the Clinton campaign, and leaking of emails and documents. In addition to the Russian nationals and entities, the Special Counsel indicted the President’s campaign chairman (Paul Manafort) and his top deputy (Rick Gates), his campaign adviser and national security adviser (Ret. Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn), two other campaign advisers (Roger Stone and George Papadopoulos), his personal lawyer (Michael Cohen), a Dutch attorney (Alex Van Der Zwaan), a California man with no connection to the Trump campaign (Richard Pinedo), and a Russian woman living in the U.S. (Maria Butina).

Special Counsel Mueller delivered his final report to U.S. Attorney General Barr last Friday. AG Barr and Deputy AG Rosenstein spent the weekend reviewing the 300-page report and preparing a summary for Congress. 

The Special Counsel’s report was divided into two sections: the first was on Russian interference in the 2016 elections and the second was on the question of obstruction of justice. AG Barr summarized that the Special Counsel did not find evidence of conspiracy to the rigorous standards of the criminal law that anyone associated with the Trump campaign knowingly conspired with Russia’s efforts to influence the 2016 presidential campaign. 

On obstruction of justice, the Special Counsel did not draw a conclusion one way or the other. Instead, the report set out evidence on both sides and left it up to the AG to determine whether the conduct the Special Counsel described in the report constituted a crime. AG Barr and Deputy AG Rosenstein concluded from the report that there was not sufficient evidence to establish that the President committed an obstruction of justice offense. However, AG Barr noted that the Special Counsel wrote, “while this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him.” 

AG Barr indicated that more material from the report is forthcoming as it is his goal to release as much of it as possible. First DOJ must review what material in the report could be subject to Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 6(e), which imposes restrictions on the use and disclosure of information relating to matters occurring before a grand jury. And Special Counsel Mueller referred several matters to other offices, including the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District ofNY, for further action. The AG must identify any information in the report that could impact those matters before releasing it to Congress or the public.

Attorney General Barr Letter to Congress re: Mueller Report

https://www.scribd.com/document/402973432/AG-March-24-2019-Letter-to-House-and-Senate-Judiciary-Committees#from_embed

President Delivers FY20 Budget to Congress

The President delivered the overview of his FY20 budget to Congress this week. The budget justification details for each agency will be made available next week. The President requested $750B in defense funding with $174B of that from Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) and $543B in nondefense funding with an additional $24B in OCO for nondefense emergency spending. Assuming the very rosy economic scenarios of a 3.2% growth rate this year that are included in the budget request (CBO projects a 2.3% growth rate), deficits will gradually decline but will not be eliminated for 15 years. And the budget request assumes much steeper cuts in later years.

Now that the President’s FY20 budget request has been delivered to Congress, the House and Senate can begin the budget resolution process. House Democrats may forgo a vote on a budget resolution this year rather than divide their caucus over whether to push for an increase or decrease in military spending. The Progressive Caucus members may vote against a budget resolution with an increase in defense spending. House Budget Committee John Yarmuth (D-KY) said that if his committee marks up a budget resolution, then he expects it to go to the House floor for a vote. On the Senate side, Senate Budget Committee Chairman Mike Enzi (R-WY) said he has not received a commitment that the FY20 budget resolution he is writing will go to the Senate floor for a vote. Enzi is expected to write the Senate budget resolution to the stator caps proposed in the President’s budget request.

In the event that the House and Senate don’t pass FY20 budget resolutions, House and Senate leadership are discussing potentially agreeing on spending limits to allow the FY20 appropriations process to go forward. Senate Republicans will be under pressure from the White House to increase the overall defense spending while holding nondefense to the budgetary cap. Senate Appropriators may use FY19 toplines for defense and nondefense programs as a fallback for FY20 if an agreement isn’t reached before they begin consideration of their 12 annual spending bills.

The FY19 enacted levels for defense and nondefense spending (including OCO) were $716B and $620.6B, respectively.

 FY20 (cap)FY20 PresidentFY21 (cap)
Defense$630.0B$576.0B$644.0B
OCO Defense $174.0B 
Non-Defense$578.0B $590.0B
OCO Nondefense   

Agriculture

The 2020 Budget requests $20.8 billion for USDA, a $3.6 billion or 15-percent decrease from the 2019 estimate (including changes in mandatory programs and receipts). 

Commerce

The Budget requests $12.2 billion for DOC, a $1.0 billion or a 9.3-percent increase from the 2019 estimate. 

Defense

The Budget requests $718 billion for DOD, a $33 billion or 5-percent increase from the 2019 enacted level. 

Education

The Budget requests $62.0 billion for the Department of Education, an $8.5 billion or 12.0-percent decrease compared to the 2019 enacted level (including cancellations of Pell Grant unobligated balances). Excluding cancellations, the Budget requests a program level of $64.0 billion for the Department of Education, a $7.1 billion or 10.0-percent decrease compared to the 2019 enacted level. 

Energy

The 2020 Budget requests $31.7 billion for DOE, an 11-percent decrease from the 2019 enacted level. 

Health and Human Services

The 2020 Budget requests $87.1 billion for HHS, a 12-percent decrease from the 2019 estimated level. The Budget proposes $1,248.8 billion in net mandatory health savings, reducing longer-term deficits. 

Homeland Security

The 2020 Budget requests $51.7 billion in discretionary appropriations for DHS, a $3.7 billion or 7.8-percent increase from the 2019 estimate (excluding 2019 amounts for Overseas Contingency Operations). 

Housing and Urban Development

The Budget requests $44.1 billion in gross discretionary funding for HUD, an $8.7 billion or 16.4-percent decrease from the 2019 estimate. 

Interior

The Budget requests $12.5 billion for DOI, a $2 billion or 14-percent decrease from the 2019 estimate (including 2019 changes in mandatory programs). 

Justice

The Budget requests $29.2 billion for the Department of Justice, a $698 million or 2-percent decrease from the 2019 estimate. The Budget targets funding increases to support public safety and national security while reducing or eliminating lower priority spending. 

Labor

The Budget requests $10.9 billion for DOL, a $1.2 billion or 9.7-percent decrease from the 2019 enacted level. 

State

The Budget requests $40.0 billion for the Department of State and USAID, a $12.3 billion or 23-percent decrease from the 2019 estimate. The Budget also requests $1.6 billion for Department of the Treasury international programs, approximately equal to the 2019 estimate. 

Transportation

The Budget requests $21.4 billion in discretionary budget authority for 2020, a $5.9 billion or 22-percent decrease from the 2019 discretionary estimate. The Budget also provides $62.2 billion in mandatory funds and obligation limitations. 

Treasury

The Budget also proposes a program integrity initiative to narrow the gap between taxes owed and taxes paid that is estimated to reduce the deficit by $33 billion over 10 years. 

Veterans Affairs

The Budget requests $93.1 billion for VA, a $6.5 billion or 7.5-percent increase from the 2019 enacted level. In addition, the Budget requests $87.6 billion in advance appropriations for VA medical care programs in 2021 to ensure the Department has sufficient resources to continue providing the premier services that veterans have earned. The request also includes new legislative authorities and $123.1 billion in mandatory budget authority, including $129.5 billion in 2021 advance appropriations for other critical veteran and survivor benefits. 

NASA

The Budget requests $21 billion for NASA, a $283 million or 1.4-percent increase from the 2019 estimate. 

House Passes Joint Resolution Terminating President’s Emergency Declaration

The House passed H.J. Res. 46, a joint resolution that would terminate a national emergency regarding border security that was declared by the President on February 15, 2019.The resolution passed by a vote of 245 to 182 with thirteen Republicans (Amash-MI, Fitzpatrick-PA, Gallagher-WI, Herrera Beutler-WA, Hurd-TX, Johnson-SD, Massie-KY, Rodgers-WA, Rooney-FL, Sensenbrenner-WI, Stefanik-NY, Upton-MI, Walden-OR) joining all Democrats in voting for the measure. House Minority Whip Steve Scalise said that while he hoped the Senate would block disapproval Trump’s national emergency regarding border security, he thought it would have no chance of a veto override in the House.

Sens. Susan Collins (R-ME), Tom Udall (D-NM), Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) and Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) introduced companion legislation to H.J. Res 46 in the Senate. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) said it would be reasonable to expect the Senate would vote on S.J. Res. 10before the next recess week, which is the week of March 18. Democrats need at least four Republicans to vote in support of the resolution. Once again, even it passes the Senate, it almost certainly won’t become law as the President will veto it and the House and Senate won’t have the two-thirds majority votes to override his veto.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) has said that Congress should consider amending the National Emergencies Act of 1976 (P.L. 94-412), the law that gives the President the power to declare emergencies of unlimited duration, so that emergency declarations expire after a certain period of time unless Congress ratifies them by law. The time period could be as short as 10 days.

White House Statement of Administration Policy on H.J. Res. 46

https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/saphj46h_20190226.pdf

House and Senate Complete Action on FY2019 Spending Bills

The House and Senate voted today on an FY19 appropriations conference report that includes the seven remaining spending bills. The Senate took up H.J. Res. 31 first and passed it by a vote of 83-16. The no votes were from Sens. Booker (D-NJ), Braun (R-IN), Cotton (R-AR), Cruz (R-TX), Gillibrand (D-NY), Harris (D-CA), Hawley (R-MO), Inhofe (R-OK), Lee (R-UT), Markey (D-MA), Paul (R-KY), Rubio (R-FL), Sasse (R-NE), Scott (R-SC), Toomey (R-PA), and Warren (D-MA). The House followed and passed the bill by a vote of 300 to 128. Nineteen Democrats and 109 Republicans voted against the measure.

The conference report included the Agriculture, Commerce-Justice-Science, Financial Services, Homeland Security, Interior-Environment, State-Foreign Operations, and Transportation-HUD FY19 spending bills. 

In order to get a final deal, conferees had to give up on including several other provisions that members were seeking, such as securing back pay for federal contractors who lost work during the 35-day partial shutdown, reauthorizing the Violence Against Women Act, retroactively extending expired tax credits, and stopping automatic spending cuts to mandatory programs under the 2010 pay-as-you-go law. 

The bill now goes to the President for his signature. President Trump indicated earlier today that he will declare an emergency in order to allow the administration to redirect funds to fund a wall on the southwest border. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) said they would support this move by the President. Not all Senate Republicans, including Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn (R-TX) are on board with an emergency declaration as it sets a dangerous precedent and undermines the role of Congress. House Armed Services Committee Ranking Republican Mac Thornberry (R-TX) encouraged the President not to divert significant Department of Defense funding for border security as it would have detrimental consequences for our troops and military infrastructure. House Democrats could pass legislation to block the President’s emergency declaration. They could also sue the President and challenge his emergency declaration in court. Republicans sued then-President Barack Obama in 2014 over the Affordable Care Act. It was the first time a district-court judge affirmed the right of the House of Representatives, as an institution, to sue a sitting President. 

Bill Text

https://docs.house.gov/billsthisweek/20190211/CRPT-116hrpt9_u2-.pdf

Joint Explanatory Statement

https://docs.house.gov/billsthisweek/20190211/116hrpt9-JointExplanatoryStatement-u1.pdf

House Democrat Summary

https://appropriations.house.gov/sites/democrats.appropriations.house.gov/files/documents/Summary%20of%20Conference%20Report.pdf

Senate Democrat Summary

https://www.appropriations.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/Minibus%2019.pdf

Senate Republican Summary

https://www.appropriations.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/021319%20Combined%20Bill%20Summary.pdf

House and Senate Conferees to Continue Negotiations This Weekend on FY19 Homeland Security Spending

House and Senate negotiators are planning to work through the weekend to reach a border security deal that would clear the way for a final FY19 spending package. 

The conferees held a closed-door briefing on Wednesday with Customs and Border Protection officials as well as Carla Provost, Chief of U.S. Border Patrol. According to the White House, the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) briefer was not allowed in to the briefing room. (https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/washington-times-ice-shut-border-talks-warns-democrats-plans-free-thousands-criminals/)

Details on how much funding and what type of construction would be allowed as barriers along the border are still being negotiated.

A disaster supplemental may be included in the final deal. Earlier this year, the House passed a $14.2B aid package for victims of hurricanes, wildfires, typhoons and other recent natural disasters. Senate Republicans introduced their own $12.8B package, but it hasn’t been considered on the Senate floor.

The conferees’ goal is to produce legislative text on Monday. They have been told to stay in town this weekend to be able to sign a conference report. Some members of the conference committee – Reps. Cuellar (D-TX), Fleischmann (R-TN), and Graves (R-GA) – are among those in a bipartisan group heading to Camp David this evening to discuss the 2019 legislative agenda with Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney.

The question is whether or not President Trump will sign what the conferees produce. Democratic leaders have expressed concerns about this pointing to previous reversals by the President including his most recent refusal to sign a six-week stopgap in December, which led to the 35-day partial government shutdown. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) dismissed those concerns saying that the President would sign it if there is a deal and there are enough bipartisan votes for it to pass. And Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard Shelby (R-AL) met with the President this week. He said that the President urged him to get a deal done, and that he thinks the President would sign a final bill.

Congress must pass a final spending package or another continuing resolution by February 15 in order to avoid another shutdown. 

Conferees Begin Negotiations on FY19 Homeland Spending

House and Senate conferees for the FY19 Homeland Security appropriations conference met this week to begin their negotiations. Congress has two weeks left to pass a spending bill to avoid another partial shutdown. Senate conferees include Sens. Shelby (R-AL), Moore Capito (R-WV), Hoeven (R-ND), Blunt (R-MO), Leahy (D-VT), Durbin (D-IL), and Tester (D-MT). House conferees include: Reps. Lowey (D-NY), Roybal-Allard (D-CA), Price (D-NC), Lee (D-CA), Cuellar (D-TX), Aguilar (D-CA), Granger (R-TX), Fleischmann (R-TN), Graves (R-GA), and Palazzo (R-MS).

The conference committee is tasked with deciding a way forward on Homeland Security funding. Both sides expressed optimism about reaching a compromise, though there has been little budging in positions so far.

House Democrats released a list of their proposals for border security that they intend to advocate for in the conference committee. Their proposal indicated that they are willing to spend more on border security but that they don’t plan to use emergency funding to get around the budget caps for FY19. The Democrat proposal also made no mention of funding for new physical barriers or a wall. It also restricts where approved funding for barriers can be built. 

On the other side of the negotiating table, Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard Shelby (R-AL), in his opening remarks on Wednesday, advocated for an approach that includes technology, infrastructure, personnel, and physical barriers. Shelby said that “Smart technology alone does not actually stop anyone from crossing into the U.S. illegally.”

There is still some discussion about making the deal bigger than just funding for border security. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) said that he would have no concerns about conferees expanding the scope of the discussion if they need to get an agreement. The expanded scope could include the debt ceiling and FY20 and FY21 budget caps. Senate Finance Committee Chairman Grassley (R-IA) wants to attach a tax extenders package renewing 26 expired tax breaks to any final spending deal.Outside of the conference negotiation room, President Trump was tweeting that if the final agreement did not include funding for a wall or physical barrier that “they are [w]asting their time!” The President also said that there is a good chance that he will declare a national emergency at the southern border in order to use Department of Defense dollars for a wall. He may announce this emergency declaration during his State of the Union address Tuesday evening. 

Partial Federal Government Shutdown Possible Next Week

The current continuing resolution (CR) funding seven of the 12 annual appropriations bills expires at midnight next Friday (December 21). If Congress and the White House cannot reach agreement before then, nine cabinet departments and several dozen smaller federal agencies will shutdown.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) met with the President and Vice President earlier this week that was expected to be a private meeting negotiating the final spending bills. Instead, the President invited the press in to the Oval Office to cover the meeting. During that meeting the President said that he would be proud to shut down the government if Congress did not provide the funding he requested for the border wall.

There a few options Congress can consider to avoid a shutdown:

  1. Pass a CR funding the seven bills through December 26
  2. Pass a CR funding the seven bills through January 3 (the first day of the new Congress when Democrats will control the House)
  3. Pass a CR funding the seven bills through early 2019 (January-March)
  4. Pass a CR funding the seven bills for the rest of FY2019
  5. Pass a “minibus” funding six bills and a year-long CR for the DHS bill
  6. Pass a “minibus” funding all seven bills if agreement can be reached on how much funding should be appropriated for a border wall

The House does not return until Wednesday evening next week leaving only two days to pass something and prevent a partial shutdown of the federal government.

House and Senate Delay FY19 Appropriations with New CR

The current FY19 appropriations continuing resolution (CR) was set to expire at midnight tonight. While legislative action was largely paused this week for memorial services for former President George H.W. Bush, the House and Senate were able to clear another CR funding the remaining seven appropriations bills through December 21. The House cleared the new CR through a unanimous consent agreement, and the Senate followed passing it by voice vote. The President signed it into law today.

The CR also extends a number of expiring authorizations including the National Flood Insurance Program, the Violence Against Women Act, and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families

The President’s FY19 budget request submitted to Congress in February of this year requested $1.6B for 65 miles of new border wall system in southern Texas. The Senate has included $1.6B in their FY19 Homeland Security appropriations bill. The President informally increased the request to $5B in a meeting with congressional Republicans in June. A formal budget amendment with details of how the $5B would be spent has not been submitted to Congress. The House included $5B in their FY19 Homeland Security appropriations bill. Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard Shelby (R-AL) has proposed a down payment of $2.5B for the border wall in FY19 followed by another $2.5B in FY20. President Trump has threatened to veto any spending measure that does not include $5B for the wall.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) said that Democrats would support one of two options – either an omnibus with the seven remaining bills with the Homeland bill including $1.6B for the wall or a spending package that includes six of the seven remaining FY19 appropriations bills and a full-year CR for the Department of Homeland Security. Schumer and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) are scheduled to meet with President Trump on Tuesday.

The administration has also submitted to Congress a four-page list that includes $4.76B in FY19 funding anomalies that they would like to see funded in the final FY19 spending bill. These new spending requests include funding for national security reviews of foreign purchases by U.S. businesses, to help combat more frequent wildfire outbreaks, and to care for unaccompanied migrant children in custody. How Congress will be able to accommodate these new funding requests given the funding caps is unclear. The remaining seven House bills are already $736M above their nondefense spending cap for FY19.

FY2019 Full-Year Funding Anomalies Requested by Trump Administration

http://www.vantagepointstrat.com/anomalies/

Subcommittee House Action Senate Action Conference
Agriculture Subcommittee: May 9

Full Committee: May 16

Subcommittee: May 22

Full Committee: May 24

Floor: August 1

 
Commerce Justice Science Subcommittee: May 9

Full Committee: May 17

Subcommittee: June 12

Full Committee: June 14

 
Defense Subcommittee: June 7

Full Committee: June 13

Floor: June 28

Subcommittee: June 26

Full Committee: June 28

Floor: August 23

House Floor: Sept. 26

Senate Floor: Sept. 18

Signed Into Law: Sept. 28 (P.L. 115-245)

Energy & Water Subcommittee: May 7

Full Committee: May 16

Floor: June 8

Subcommittee: May 22

Full Committee: May 24

Floor: June 25

House Floor: Sept. 12

Senate Floor: Sept. 13

Signed Into Law: Sept. 21 (P.L. 115-244)

Financial Services Subcommittee: May 24

Full Committee: June 13

Floor: July 19

Subcommittee: June 19

Full Committee: June 21

Floor: August 1

 
Homeland Security Subcommittee: July 19

Full Committee: July 25

Subcommittee: June 19

Full Committee: June 21

 
Interior Environment Subcommittee: May 15

Full Committee: June 6

Floor: July 19

Subcommittee: June 12

Full Committee: June 14

Floor: August 1

 
Labor HHS Education Subcommittee: June 15

Full Committee: July 11

Subcommittee: June 26

Full Committee: June 28

Floor: August 23

House Floor: Sept. 26

Senate Floor: Sept. 18

Signed Into Law: Sept. 28 (P.L. 115-245)

Legislative Branch Subcommittee: April 26

Full Committee: May 8

Floor: June 8

Full Committee: June 14

Floor: June 25

House Floor: Sept. 12

Senate Floor: Sept. 13

Signed Into Law: Sept. 21 (P.L. 115-244)

Military Construction VA Subcommittee: April 26

Full Committee: May 8

Floor: June 8

Subcommittee: June 5

Full Committee: June 7

Floor: June 25

House Floor: Sept. 12

Senate Floor: Sept. 13

Signed Into Law: Sept. 21 (P.L. 115-244)

State Foreign Operations Subcommittee: June 13

Full Committee: June 20

Subcommittee: June 19

Full Committee: June 21

 
Transportation HUD Subcommittee: May 16

Full Committee: May 23

Subcommittee: June 5

Full Committee: June 7

Floor: August 1